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51 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try 
ROBERTSON, Elizabeth (I1140)
 
52 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try 
ROBERTSON, Isabel (I1141)
 
53 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try 
ROBERTSON, George (I1142)
 
54 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&h=- 109598572&indiv=try 
ROBERTSON, James (I1143)
 
55 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=websearch-4181&h=407 9824&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=websearch-4181&h=407 9824&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
NAME WebTag
URL http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=websearch-4181&h=407 9824&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt 
WILLIAMS, Margeret Ellen (I48)
 
56 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=93427436 
AUSTIN, Carroll Dorothy (I14)
 
57 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.myheritage.com/
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.myheritage.com/ 
LEAN, Richard (I75)
 
58 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nzlscant/MEMORIAM.htm
NAME WebTag
URL http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~ashleigh/1870-1908/1893.April.Star.Ch ristchurch.BMD.html 
MCAVENEY, Jannett (I234)
 
59 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FPND-CD8
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FPND-CD8 
TIPPING, Elizabeth (I1100)
 
60 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FPND-CD8 
MCCOY, Elizabeth (I582)
 
61 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FSB2-ZP1 
CARROLL, Thomas (I111)
 
62 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J7W4-KMK 
LEAN, Elizabeth (I750)
 
63 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J9S5-T8V 
LEAN, Robert (I74)
 
64 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KDTM-RBQ 
DUNN, Thomas (I184)
 
65 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NB8C-7HD 
WILSON, Margaret (I702)
 
66 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NB8C-7HD 
WILSON, Smith (I701)
 
67 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NG9L-8LV
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NG9L-NDW
OBJE: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://leanfamily.shawwebspace.ca/ 
LEANE, Robert (I463)
 
68 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NG9L-8LV 
LEAN, Christopher John (I62)
 
69 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NG9L-8LV 
ROGERS, Maria (I464)
 
70 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NG9L-NDW 
LEANE, Lewis (I465)
 
71 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NG9L-NDW 
JEELE, Marjery (I466)
 
72 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NRM4-SQQ 
LEAN, Robert (I70)
 
73 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V5G2-CL1
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.freebmd.org.uk/cgi/information.pl?cite=WwXkr7CxTdU4yUuI brYdVQ&scan=1
NAME WebTag
URL http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2057904 &id=I100155513
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NB8C-7HD
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NB8C-7HD
NAME WebTag
URL http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2057904 &id=I100155513
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.freebmd.org.uk/cgi/information.pl?cite=WwXkr7CxTdU4yUuI brYdVQ&scan=1 
WILSON, Jane (I134)
 
74 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V5G2-CL1
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V5G2-CL1
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V5G2-CL1 
WANKLYN, Sarah (I33)
 
75 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V5G2-CL1 
WANKLYN, John Bradshaw (I133)
 
76 The Proof that James Stewart and Margeret Richardson moved from Kelso to Berwick llies in the Baptisim records of Robert Stewart, their eldest son that clearly states that while Robert was born in Kelso (see Souce from familysearch) he was baptised in Berwick-upon-Tweed STEWART, James (I407)
 
77 There ARE two marriage entries for the same day for William Robertson a nd Christian Wilson in the parish entrys for the parishes of Udny and F overan. In the Entry for the parish of Foveran it states that Willam Ro bertson is of the parish of Udny, and in the parish records for Udny it m ay state (cant read writing) that the entruys were added later, but as i t is exactly the same date it can be assumed with some degree o cerntai nty that this is the same event entered twice, unless there is other ev idence that surfaces later to contridct this ROBERTSON, William (I280)
 
78 There is evidence to sugest that Charls and Isabella died sometime shor tly after the birth of their youngest daugther as the census record wou ld suggest that she was living with Aunts? at the age of 7 at the time o f the census REID, Charles (I197)
 
79 WEDDING BELLS

BLYTHE- HUNTER. On Tuesday morning, November 26tb, a large circle of fr iends assisted at a very pretty and interesting function at Burnside. t he residence of Mrs Moore Hunter. The event was the marriage of her dau ghter Jeanie to Mr David Blythe, of Wanganui. Tbe bridal party was grou ped for the ceremony in the porch, which was decorated for the occasion , and formed a novel and effective picture, the ministers and guests oc cupying the lawn. The bride looked sweet and dignified in a rich dress o f white brocaded satin, the only trimming being a deep fall of Honiton l ace and a spray of orange blossom on the bodice. The veil was delicatel y embroidered. The bride carried a lovely shower bouquet, and was atten ded by her three sisters. Miss Millie Hunter, as chief bridesmaid, wore a d ress of white silk with daffodil yellow chiffon sash, also a gold bangl e, the gift of the bridegroom and carried a bouquet of yellow and whlt e flowers. Misses Belle and Mary wore cream silk dresses and dainty gol d necklets and lockets, the bridegroom's gifts, and carried baskets of c rimson roses. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr A. Hunter and t he bridegroom was attended by his brother, Mr J. Blythe, as best man. T he ceremony was performed by Rev T. McDonald of Waipukurau, assisted by R ev I. E. Bertram. After a sumptuous breakfast, Rev T. McDonald, in a sh ort speech, voiced the feeling of the assembled company in wishing Mr a nd Mrs Blythe happiness and prosperity. Mr Blythe shortly returned than ks on behalf of himself and his wife. The wedding-cake was handsome and i mposing, having three tiers most elaborately decorated. The bride's tra velling dress was a coat and skirt of fine blue cloth, lined with white s atin. She wore a white chiffon boa, and Black hat with two cloth-of-gol d roses under the brim, in which she looked charming. Mr and Mrs Blythe l eft by train for Nelson. The presents were numerous and costly, and cam e from far and near.

Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLII, Issue 7369, 30 November 1901, Page 3 
HUNTER, Jeannie (I20)
 
80 WEDDING BELLS

BLYTHE- HUNTER. On Tuesday morning, November 26tb, a large circle of fr iends assisted at a very pretty and interesting function at Burnside. t he residence of Mrs Moore Hunter. The event was the marriage of her dau ghter Jeanie to Mr David Blythe, of Wanganui. Tbe bridal party was grou ped for the ceremony in the porch, which was decorated for the occasion , and formed a novel and effective picture, the ministers and guests oc cupying the lawn. The bride looked sweet and dignified in a rich dress o f white brocaded satin, the only trimming being a deep fall of Honiton l ace and a spray of orange blossom on the bodice. The veil was delicatel y embroidered. The bride carried a lovely shower bouquet, and was atten ded by her three sisters. Miss Millie Hunter, as chief bridesmaid, wore a d ress of white silk with daffodil yellow chiffon sash, also a gold bangl e, the gift of the bridegroom and carried a bouquet of yellow and whlt e flowers. Misses Belle and Mary wore cream silk dresses and dainty gol d necklets and lockets, the bridegroom's gifts, and carried baskets of c rimson roses. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr A. Hunter and t he bridegroom was attended by his brother, Mr J. Blythe, as best man. T he ceremony was performed by Rev T. McDonald of Waipukurau, assisted by R ev I. E. Bertram. After a sumptuous breakfast, Rev T. McDonald, in a sh ort speech, voiced the feeling of the assembled company in wishing Mr a nd Mrs Blythe happiness and prosperity. Mr Blythe shortly returned than ks on behalf of himself and his wife. The wedding-cake was handsome and i mposing, having three tiers most elaborately decorated. The bride's tra velling dress was a coat and skirt of fine blue cloth, lined with white s atin. She wore a white chiffon boa, and Black hat with two cloth-of-gol d roses under the brim, in which she looked charming. Mr and Mrs Blythe l eft by train for Nelson. The presents were numerous and costly, and cam e from far and near.

Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLII, Issue 7369, 30 November 1901, Page 3 
Family F69
 
81 Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life the p a st of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero. A sto r y filled with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered important back - up equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome and unloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only other option was to m a nually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. He returned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behind a s ta ck of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fu e l.
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets. Se v eral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting in th e d amage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighters cou ld h ave returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. T h e lives of the remaining crews depended on the swift departure of the s u rviving plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using their fallen com r ades as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austin later repli e d to this thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books and un i forms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobs sca r ce. Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an exciting pros p ect for many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he would enjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in these countr i es, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently the planes we r e stripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d i scarded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course. Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded the O r der of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to go hom e a nd watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thought that b l oke’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So into my litt l e ute, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and h e lped pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, was he hot. The am bu lance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to ho s pital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat every time he choked. O f ten wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, then on a b o at to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life thepa s t of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero.A stor y f illed with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered importantback- u p equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome andunloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only otheroption was to m an ually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. Hereturned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behinda st ac k of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fue l .
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets.Sev e ral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting inthe d a mage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighterscould h a ve returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. The l i ves of the remaining crews depended on the swift departureof the survi v ing plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using theirfallen comr a des as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austinlater replied t o t his thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books anduni f orms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobsscarc e . Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an excitingprospec t f or many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he wouldenjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in thesecountri e s, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently theplanes wer e s tripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d is carded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course.Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded theOr d er of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to gohome a n d watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thoughtthat blo k e’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So intomy little u t e, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and hel p ed pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, washe hot. The amb ul ance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to hos p ital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat everytime he choked. Of t en wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, thenon a b oa t to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.
Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life the p a st of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero. A sto r y filled with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered important back - up equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome and unloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only other option was to m a nually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. He returned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behind a s ta ck of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fu e l.
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets. Se v eral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting in th e d amage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighters cou ld h ave returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. T h e lives of the remaining crews depended on the swift departure of the s u rviving plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using their fallen com r ades as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austin later repli e d to this thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books and un i forms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobs sca r ce. Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an exciting pros p ect for many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he would enjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in these countr i es, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently the planes we r e stripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d i scarded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course. Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded the O r der of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to go hom e a nd watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thought that b l oke’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So into my litt l e ute, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and h e lped pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, was he hot. The am bu lance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to ho s pital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat every time he choked. O f ten wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, then on a b o at to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life thepa s t of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero.A stor y f illed with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered importantback- u p equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome andunloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only otheroption was to m an ually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. Hereturned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behinda st ac k of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fue l .
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets.Sev e ral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting inthe d a mage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighterscould h a ve returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. The l i ves of the remaining crews depended on the swift departureof the survi v ing plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using theirfallen comr a des as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austinlater replied t o t his thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books anduni f orms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobsscarc e . Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an excitingprospec t f or many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he wouldenjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in thesecountri e s, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently theplanes wer e s tripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d is carded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course.Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded theOr d er of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to gohome a n d watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thoughtthat blo k e’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So intomy little u t e, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and hel p ed pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, washe hot. The amb ul ance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to hos p ital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat everytime he choked. Of t en wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, thenon a b oa t to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.
TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=93427436 
AUSTIN-SMITH, John Austin Henry (I4)
 
82 William (1766) and his family lived near Dixton, a village near Monmou th on the Welsh border . John Bradshaw a merchant travelling on busine ss took a fancy to young William Wanklyn and offered him work and took h im to Manchester. The Wanklyns come from the Hereford Worcester area. W illiam married John Bradshaw's daughter Sarah in 1796 or 1797 at St. Jo hns Church ,
Deansgate, Manchester and lived on Quay Street. They ran a business by t he name of Bradshaw, Hibbert & Wanklyn (JohnBradshaw, James Hibbert and W illiam Wanklyn). They established business interests in Buenos Aires, A rgentina and most of the family spent time down there. Johnny Wanklyn a m ember of the family still farms in Argentina. James Hibbert Wanklyn, W illiam James Wanklyn's dad was named after James Hibbert and of course t his is where Hibbert come s from in the family.
Mark Wanklyn 
WANKLYN, William (I135)
 
83 William Leonard Williams, known as Leonard Williams to Pakeha and as Mi t a Renata to Maori, was born at Paihia, Bay of Islands, New Zealand, on 2 2 J uly 1829. He was the third child and eldest son of Jane Nelson and h er h usband, William Williams, of the Church Missionary Society. In his e ar ly years Leonard was educated mainly by his father at the English boy s ' school at Paihia, later at Te Waimate (Waimate North), and at the Tu r anga mission station, Poverty Bay, to which his parents moved at the e n d of 1839. In 1844 he attended the boys' grammar school, part of the S t J ohn's College complex, which Bishop G. A. Selwyn had established at T e W aimate and then shifted to Purewa, Auckland. In November 1847 Willia ms l eft St John's, where he had been Whytehead scholar, to go to the ev ang elical Magdalen Hall, Oxford, England. It would seem to have been Le on ard's own inclination - as well as being expected by Selwyn and hoped f o r by William Williams - that he follow in his father's footsteps. He h a d quite literally done so in his early teens, accompanying William Wil l iams on several of his East Coast journeys.
Leonard Williams graduated BA with third-class honours from the Univers i ty of Oxford in 1852. He then offered himself for service with the Chu r ch Missionary Society, and after taking a training course at the CMS c o llege at Islington was admitted to deacon's orders on 22 May 1853. On 1 6 J une 1853 he married Sarah Wanklyn at Witherslack Chapel, Westmorland . O n 6 August of that year he and Sarah sailed in the Hamilla Mitchell f o r New Zealand, arriving at Auckland on 30 November. After visiting oth e r members of the Williams clan in the Bay of Islands he took up missio n d uties with his father at Whakato, the Turanga station, in February 1 85 4. Selwyn admitted him to priest's orders at Lyttelton on 21 December 1 8 56.
Williams had been especially commissioned by the London CMS to underta k e the systematic training of Maori students with a view to recruiting t h e men as ordinands to the ministry and the women as their wives. He he l d firmly to the missionary belief that in order to be trained, Maori h a d to be removed from their own villages where 'their own careless way' w o uld constantly interrupt that training. New habits, he hoped, would 'r a ise them a little in the social scale' and enable them better to instr u ct their own people. At Whakato there was insufficient land to support t h is live-in, self-supporting training centre and when Te Whanau-a-Taupa r a hapu of Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki offered a block of 593 acres at Waerenga - a-hika, about eight miles further inland, the offer was accepted. The g o vernment, however, would not recognise the validity of any title not c o nferred by the Crown, and as Williams was to write later, 'Nothing was f u rther from the thoughts of the natives than that the Crown should be a l lowed to get any footing in the district'. Somewhat grudgingly a deed o f c ession to the Crown was eventually signed in April 1857. The move to W a erenga-a-hika was made in May, when William and Jane Williams as well a s L eonard and Sarah took up residence there. To begin with, its schools h a d about 50 students. By 1860 numbers had doubled and Maori of the newl y f ormed Waiapu diocese were increasingly making provision for an endow me nt fund to support their future Maori pastors.
But the circumstances under which Waerenga-a-hika was founded were not a u spicious for its future. Ngati Kaipoho and Ngati Maru of Rongowhakaata h a d been opposed to the move from Whakato, and Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki found t h at although it was they who had ceded the land, the schools were more p a rticularly for Maori from other parts of the diocese. There were also o t her disquieting factors. Increased Maori--trader contact had made drun k enness commonplace, and Christianity was losing its appeal. Williams a t tributed this to the fact that the native teachers had not sufficient c o mmand of English to read English books and consequently were inclined t o ' vegetate and grow stale'. In some districts a sub-Christian cult, Ko wh iowhio - communicating with the dead - replaced mission practice. Wil l iams did not think that the 1860--61 Taranaki war greatly affected the W a iapu diocese. There was sympathy for Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitake, and Ng a ti Porou were divided for and against the Maori king, but there was no h o stility shown to the few Pakeha settlers. Williams was convinced that t h e prevalent hostility to the government was because it had adopted a p o licy of non-interference in disputes which broke out in 'native distri c ts': 'The Natives have thus been deprived of one of the most important p r ivileges involved in their becoming British subjects, and the advantag e o f living under a regular Government has not been appreciated by them b e cause they have not enjoyed it'.
In 1862 Leonard Williams became archdeacon of Waiapu. His father, now b i shop of Waiapu, had long considered him the only suitable person to su p erintend the Maori clergy, but because of their relationship had held b a ck the appointment until he had Selwyn's full concurrence.
The incursion of a group of Hauhau into Poverty Bay in March 1865 cause d a c omplete disruption of missionary work. The groundswell of disencha ntme nt with Christianity and disaffection with the government had not p rep ared either William or Leonard Williams for the sudden and almost co mp lete swing of Rongowhakaata and Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki to an initial emb r ace of the Pai Marire faith. Pockets of mission supporters remained al o ng the East Coast and to a lesser degree within Poverty Bay. To encour a ge these communities to remain steadfast, Leonard Williams remained wh e n William Williams and the rest of the family left Poverty Bay for Nap i er at the beginning of April. Leonard Williams hoped to remain quietly a t W aerenga-a-hika to continue with the schools and convince local Maori t o r eturn to Christianity. But, he wrote in his journal, he and his fath er ' seemed to be consideredÉscapegoats on whom might be laid all the bl ame o f the present unsatisfactory state of the district'.
Thirty-five mission students left Poverty Bay on 22 August 1865 for a t e mporary school, which William Williams had begun at Horotutu, near Pai h ia. During the same month Leonard Williams moved into a cottage, Waika h ua, which he had had built on Kaiti Hill near the mouth of the Turanga n ui River. Support for Christianity now meant support for the Crown and W i lliams considered the arrival of militia and military settlers favoura b ly, although some of the Maori supporters of the mission and the gover n ment suggested to him that Christianity and Pai Marire should be allow e d to coexist. He also had the welfare of the Poverty Bay settlers to c o nsider. Hauhau raids on their farms had forced them to seek shelter in t h e relative safety of Turanganui where there was a redoubt and a pa. Wi l liams found himself the 'father of a huge family. All these women & ch i ldrenÉin a state of utter confusion to say nothing of the Maori part o f t he community and all looking up to me as the pakeke [elder].'
After Te Kooti's raid at Matawhero on 10 November 1868, Williams strove t o k eep up the morale of settlers and Maori. His own life was never thre at ened as he continued to make coastal journeys. He urged J. C. Richmon d , who was acting as native minister, to allow a large force of Ngati P o rou to garrison Turanganui and occupy some of the adjoining land. Prev i ously he had been critical of land confiscation as a penalty on Povert y B ay Maori who had supported the Hauhau, but after the fighting agains t T e Kooti he could see no alternative which would satisfy those Maori w h o had supported the government and deter aggressors.
The Waiapu diocese had been created as a particularly Maori one and Pak e ha participation was limited to missionary clergy. But with the increa s e of European settlement following land confiscation and with the town s hip of Gisborne planned, Williams thought that Pakeha would soon take t h e lead in synod administration. He therefore set about establishing na t ive church boards which would be entirely concerned with Maori church m a tters. The first of these met at Turanganui on 31 October 1870. When i l l health caused William Williams to resign as bishop of Waiapu in May 1 8 76, Leonard Williams was nominated as his successor. He declined at th i s time, determined to devote himself to building up the Maori church w i thin the diocese, and Gisborne (incorporating Turanganui) was a better c e ntre from which to achieve this than the episcopal seat at Napier.
Throughout the 1870s Williams pursued his quest for improved Maori educ a tion. He set up village schools which he hoped would be free of govern m ent assistance and interference, but because of inadequate funding and i r regular attendance they were not successful. In 1870 Williams bought s o me suburban sections in Gisborne where he built Te Rau Kahikatea, whic h b ecame his family home from 1877 until 1894. It was also to be the nu cl eus of Te Rau College, built with money from property transferred to t h e New Zealand Mission Trust Board by the London-based Church Missionar y S ociety. This Maori theological college was officially opened in 1885 . I n 1890 the school for Maori boys recommenced in the refurbished Will ia ms homestead at Waerenga-a-hika.
Williams was consecrated bishop of Waiapu in Napier cathedral on 20 Jan u ary 1895. In 1897, while attending an Anglican conference at Lambeth, h e r eceived the honorary degree of doctor of divinity from Oxford univer si ty. As bishop he still travelled indefatigably on horseback over the r o ugh tracks of his unwieldy diocese, which consisted of Bay of Plenty w i th hinterland stretching to Taupo, East Coast--Poverty Bay and Hawke's B a y, all isolated from each other by mountainous country. He resigned in 1 9 09 when he felt he was no longer able to make these arduous journeys. W i lliams died suddenly at Taumata, his Napier residence, on 24 August 19 1 6. Sarah Williams had died at Napier on 18 December 1894. There were 1 0 c hildren from their marriage.
Within his lifetime Leonard Williams had seen the flowering of the CMS m i ssion on the East Coast when Christianity had been the fashion, and th e n its dissolution into small communities not unlike the settler parish e s. He found it impossible to make any impression on the generation tha t h ad abandoned Christianity, and he acknowledged that the Ringatu fait h o f Te Kooti and his followers had 'sprung from a desireÉto find for t he mselves a religion which shall be different from that which is profes s ed by those with whom they have been at war'. He also conceded that 'p o litical feeling' had antagonised many Maori, giving them the notion th a t missionaries had come 'simply as agents of the English Government, t o p repare the way for colonization'.
Williams carried on his father's intensive study of the Maori language. T h e third and fourth editions of A dictionary of the New Zealand languag e ( 1871 and 1892) are his work. His First lessons in the Maori language f i rst appeared in 1862. East Coast (NZ) historical records was published i n 1 932, after his death. At various times he worked with his father and R o bert Maunsell revising the Maori Old and New testaments and prayer boo k . On his journeys he regularly collected plant specimens and forwarded t h em, initially, to J. D. Hooker of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, an d l ater to T. F. Cheeseman of the Auckland Institute and Museum. He als o a ssisted Cheeseman by compiling lists of Maori plant names for inclus io n in his Manual of the New Zealand flora. Williams contributed over a w i de range of subjects to the Journal of the Polynesian Society and to t h e Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute. At the ti m e of his death he was regarded as probably the most eminent Maori scho l ar of his generation.
Leonard Williams was a kindly man, quietly spoken but firm in his convi c tions, who made light of physical hardship. Occasionally travellers in t h e remote mountainous hinterland of Poverty Bay would come across one o r t wo Maori riders accompanying a Pakeha of singular appearance - tall a n d spare with a dramatic waist-length beard - leading a packhorse. They w e re surprised to learn that they had met the archdeacon or, for a few y e ars, the bishop of Waiapu on visitation.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

William Leonard Williams, known as Leonard Williams to Pakeha and as Mi t a Renata to Maori, was born at Paihia, Bay of Islands, New Zealand,on 2 2 J uly 1829. He was the third child and eldest son of Jane Nelsonand he r h usband, William Williams, of the Church Missionary Society. In his e ar ly years Leonard was educated mainly by his father at the English boy s ' school at Paihia, later at Te Waimate (Waimate North), andat the Tur a nga mission station, Poverty Bay, to which his parents moved at the en d o f 1839. In 1844 he attended the boys' grammar school, part of the St J o hn's College complex, which Bishop G. A. Selwyn had established at Te W a imate and then shifted to Purewa, Auckland. In November 1847 Williams l e ft St John's, where he had been Whytehead scholar,to go to the evangel i cal Magdalen Hall, Oxford, England. It would seem to have been Leonard ' s own inclination - as well as being expected by Selwyn and hoped for b y W illiam Williams - that he follow in his father's footsteps. He had q ui te literally done so in his early teens, accompanying William William s o n several of his East Coast journeys.
Leonard Williams graduated BA with third-class honours from the Univers i ty of Oxford in 1852. He then offered himself for service with the Chu r ch Missionary Society, and after taking a training course at the CMS c o llege at Islington was admitted to deacon's orders on 22 May 1853. On 1 6 J une 1853 he married Sarah Wanklyn at Witherslack Chapel, Westmorland . O n 6 August of that year he and Sarah sailed in the Hamilla Mitchell f o r New Zealand, arriving at Auckland on 30 November. After visiting oth e r members of the Williams clan in the Bay of Islands he took up missio n d uties with his father at Whakato, the Turanga station, in February 1 85 4. Selwyn admitted him to priest's orders at Lyttelton on 21 December 1 8 56.
Williams had been especially commissioned by the London CMS to undertak e t he systematic training of Maori students with a view to recruiting t he m en as ordinands to the ministry and the women as their wives. He he ld f irmly to the missionary belief that in order to be trained, Maori h ad t o be removed from their own villages where 'their own careless way' w o uld constantly interrupt that training. New habits, he hoped, would 'r a ise them a little in the social scale' and enable them better to instr u ct their own people. At Whakato there was insufficient land to support t h is live-in, self-supporting training centre and when Te Whanau-a-Taupa r a hapu of Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki offered a block of 593acres at Waerenga- a -hika, about eight miles further inland, the offerwas accepted. The go v ernment, however, would not recognise the validity of any title not co n ferred by the Crown, and as Williams was to write later, 'Nothing was f u rther from the thoughts of the natives than that the Crown should be a l lowed to get any footing in the district'. Somewhat grudgingly a deed o f c ession to the Crown was eventually signed in April 1857. The move to W a erenga-a-hika was made in May, when William and Jane Williams as well a s L eonard and Sarah took up residencethere. To begin with, its schools h a d about 50 students. By 1860 numbers had doubled and Maori of the newl y f ormed Waiapu diocese were increasingly making provision for an endow me nt fund to support their future Maori pastors.
But the circumstances under which Waerenga-a-hika was founded were not a u spicious for its future. Ngati Kaipoho and Ngati Maru of Rongowhakaata h a d been opposed to the move from Whakato, and Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki found t h at although it was they who had ceded the land, the schoolswere more p a rticularly for Maori from other parts of the diocese. There were also o t her disquieting factors. Increased Maori--trader contact had made drun k enness commonplace, and Christianity was losing its appeal. Williams a t tributed this to the fact that the native teachers had not sufficient c o mmand of English to read English books and consequently were inclined t o ' vegetate and grow stale'. In some districts a sub-Christian cult, Ko wh iowhio - communicating with the dead - replaced mission practice. Wil l iams did not think that the 1860--61 Taranakiwar greatly affected the W a iapu diocese. There was sympathy for Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitake, and Ng a ti Porou were divided for and against the Maori king, but there was no h o stility shown to the few Pakeha settlers. Williams was convinced that t h e prevalent hostility to the government was because it had adopted a p o licy of non-interference in disputes which broke out in 'native distri c ts': 'The Natives have thus beendeprived of one of the most important p r ivileges involved in their becoming British subjects, and the advantag e o f living under a regular Government has not been appreciated by them b e cause they have not enjoyed it'.
In 1862 Leonard Williams became archdeacon of Waiapu. His father, nowbi s hop of Waiapu, had long considered him the only suitable person tosupe r intend the Maori clergy, but because of their relationship had held ba c k the appointment until he had Selwyn's full concurrence.
The incursion of a group of Hauhau into Poverty Bay in March 1865 cause d a c omplete disruption of missionary work. The groundswell of disencha ntme nt with Christianity and disaffection with the government had not p rep ared either William or Leonard Williams for the sudden and almost co mp lete swing of Rongowhakaata and Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki to an initial emb r ace of the Pai Marire faith. Pockets of mission supporters remained al o ng the East Coast and to a lesser degree within Poverty Bay. To encour a ge these communities to remain steadfast, Leonard Williams remained wh e n William Williams and the rest of the family left Poverty Bay for Nap i er at the beginning of April. Leonard Williams hoped to remain quietly a t W aerenga-a-hika to continue with the schools and convince local Maori t o r eturn to Christianity. But, he wrote in his journal, he and his fath er ' seemed to be consideredÉscapegoats on whom mightbe laid all the bla me o f the present unsatisfactory state of the district'.
Thirty-five mission students left Poverty Bay on 22 August 1865 for ate m porary school, which William Williams had begun at Horotutu, near Paih i a. During the same month Leonard Williams moved into a cottage, Waikah u a, which he had had built on Kaiti Hill near the mouth of the Turangan u i River. Support for Christianity now meant support for the Crown and W i lliams considered the arrival of militia and military settlers favoura b ly, although some of the Maori supporters of the mission and the gover n ment suggested to him that Christianity and Pai Marire should be allow e d to coexist. He also had the welfare of the Poverty Baysettlers to co n sider. Hauhau raids on their farms had forced them to seek shelter in t h e relative safety of Turanganui where there was a redoubt and a pa. Wi l liams found himself the 'father of a huge family. All these women & ch i ldrenÉin a state of utter confusion to say nothingof the Maori part of t h e community and all looking up to me as the pakeke [elder].'
After Te Kooti's raid at Matawhero on 10 November 1868, Williams strove t o k eep up the morale of settlers and Maori. His own life was neverthrea te ned as he continued to make coastal journeys. He urged J. C. Richmond , w ho was acting as native minister, to allow a large force of Ngati Po ro u to garrison Turanganui and occupy some of the adjoining land. Previ o usly he had been critical of land confiscation as a penalty on Poverty B a y Maori who had supported the Hauhau, but after the fighting against T e K ooti he could see no alternative which would satisfy those Maori who h a d supported the government and deter aggressors.
The Waiapu diocese had been created as a particularly Maori one and Pak e ha participation was limited to missionary clergy. But with the increa s e of European settlement following land confiscation and with the town s hip of Gisborne planned, Williams thought that Pakeha would soon take t h e lead in synod administration. He therefore set about establishing na t ive church boards which would be entirely concerned with Maorichurch m a tters. The first of these met at Turanganui on 31 October 1870. When i l l health caused William Williams to resign as bishop of Waiapu in May 1 8 76, Leonard Williams was nominated as his successor. He declined at th i s time, determined to devote himself to building up the Maori church w i thin the diocese, and Gisborne (incorporating Turanganui) was a better c e ntre from which to achieve this than the episcopal seat at Napier.
Throughout the 1870s Williams pursued his quest for improved Maori educ a tion. He set up village schools which he hoped would be free of govern m ent assistance and interference, but because of inadequate fundingand i r regular attendance they were not successful. In 1870 Williams bought s o me suburban sections in Gisborne where he built Te Rau Kahikatea, whic h b ecame his family home from 1877 until 1894. It was also to be the nu cl eus of Te Rau College, built with money from property transferred to t h e New Zealand Mission Trust Board by the London-based Church Missionar y S ociety. This Maori theological college was officially opened in 1885 . I n 1890 the school for Maori boys recommenced in the refurbished Will ia ms homestead at Waerenga-a-hika.
Williams was consecrated bishop of Waiapu in Napier cathedral on 20 Jan u ary 1895. In 1897, while attending an Anglican conference at Lambeth, h e r eceived the honorary degree of doctor of divinity from Oxford univer si ty. As bishop he still travelled indefatigably on horseback over the r o ugh tracks of his unwieldy diocese, which consisted of Bay ofPlenty wi t h hinterland stretching to Taupo, East Coast--Poverty Bay and Hawke's B a y, all isolated from each other by mountainous country. He resigned in 1 9 09 when he felt he was no longer able to make these arduous journeys. W i lliams died suddenly at Taumata, his Napier residence, on 24 August 19 1 6. Sarah Williams had died at Napier on 18 December 1894. There were 1 0 c hildren from their marriage.
Within his lifetime Leonard Williams had seen the flowering of the CMS m i ssion on the East Coast when Christianity had been the fashion, and th e n its dissolution into small communities not unlike the settler parish e s. He found it impossible to make any impression on the generation tha t h ad abandoned Christianity, and he acknowledged that the Ringatu fait h o f Te Kooti and his followers had 'sprung from a desireÉto find for t he mselves a religion which shall be different from that whichis profess e d by those with whom they have been at war'. He also conceded that 'po l itical feeling' had antagonised many Maori, giving them the notion tha t m issionaries had come 'simply as agents of the English Government, to p r epare the way for colonization'.
Williams carried on his father's intensive study of the Maori language. T h e third and fourth editions of A dictionary of the New Zealand languag e ( 1871 and 1892) are his work. His First lessons in the Maori language f i rst appeared in 1862. East Coast (NZ) historical records was published i n 1 932, after his death. At various times he worked with his father and R o bert Maunsell revising the Maori Old and New testaments and prayer boo k . On his journeys he regularly collected plant specimens and forwarded t h em, initially, to J. D. Hooker of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, an d l ater to T. F. Cheeseman of the Auckland Institute and Museum. He als o a ssisted Cheeseman by compiling lists of Maoriplant names for inclusi on i n his Manual of the New Zealand flora. Williams contributed over a w id e range of subjects to the Journal of the Polynesian Society and to t h e Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute. At the ti m e of his death he was regarded as probably the most eminent Maori scho l ar of his generation.
Leonard Williams was a kindly man, quietly spoken but firm in his convi c tions, who made light of physical hardship. Occasionally travellersin t h e remote mountainous hinterland of Poverty Bay would come acrossone or t w o Maori riders accompanying a Pakeha of singular appearance- tall and s p are with a dramatic waist-length beard - leading a packhorse. They wer e s urprised to learn that they had met the archdeacon or, for a few yea rs , the bishop of Waiapu on visitation.
From http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-WilThro-t1-body-d16.h tml#n131
William Leonard Williams completed his studies at Magdalen Hall, now He rtford College, Oxford, while his father and mother were in England, an d sat for his examinations in June, 1852. After taking his B.A. Degree w ith honours he offered himself to the Church Missionary Society for ser vice in the New Zealand Mission, and was duly accepted. After taking a c ourse of Theological training at the Church Missionary College at Islin gton he was admitted to Deacon's Orders by the Bishop of London on Marc h 22nd, 1853.

When visiting his aunt, Mrs. Heathcote, at Southwell, Leonard had met t he daughters of Mr. J. B. Wanklyn of Halecat, Westmoreland. They had pr eviously been pupils at Mrs. Heathcote's School, and two of them at tim es afterwards used to visit Mrs. Heathcote and assist in her work. This a cquaintance led later to Leonard's marriage with Miss Sarah Wanklyn, wh ich with the approval of both families was celebrated at Witherslack Ch urch on June 6th, 1853. After the wedding a short honeymoon was spent i n the English Lake District.

Rev. W. L. and Mrs. Williams embarked at Gravesend on August 15th, 1853 , on the Hamilla Mitchell, a ship of 540 tons. They spent the next day a rranging their cabin for the voyage. Captain Bradley came on board duri ng the afternoon, and on the morning of August 17th the tug boat towed t hem down the river to an anchorage off Deal, whence they set sail the f ollowing morning. They had a complement of 48 passengers of whom 18 adu lts and 11 children were in the cuddy. On August 22nd they were off Ply mouth. Later they sighted the Madeira Islands, from which they were abl e to send their first letters back to the Old Country.

After variable winds and weather, on September 23rd they reached the Li ne, where they received the customary visit from Neptune and his party. R ev. Leonard Williams and Rev. A. Stock, a fellow-passenger, shared the d uties of Ship's Chaplain, and Mrs. Williams held a Sunday class for the c hildren. The voyage generally was without remarkable incident. A mild e xcitement was caused at times by the capture of fish, also of an albatr oss with a PAGE 132 wing spread of 10 feet 7 inches, and other birds. T hey dropped 
WILLIAMS, William Leonard (I32)
 
84 Witherslack Church Family F9
 
85 _SUBQ: "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (http s://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTFY-PL4 : 2 January 2015), Thomas Bl ythe, 24 Mar 1806; citing , Cupar, Fife, Scotland, reference 2:15BZ5JK; F HL microfilm 1,040,101.
_BIBL: "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (http s://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTFY-PL4 : 2 January 2015), Thomas Bl ythe, 24 Mar 1806; citing , Cupar, Fife, Scotland, reference 2:15BZ5JK; F HL microfilm 1,040,101.
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_BIBL: 1841 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: A ncestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.Original data - Census Returns of Eng land and Wales, 1841. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of th e UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the Nati onal;).
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89 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1841 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - 1841 S cotland Census. Edinburgh, Scotland: General Register Office for Scotla nd. Reels 1-151. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotl and.Original data: 18;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1841 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - 1841 S cotland Census. Edinburgh, Scotland: General Register Office for Scotla nd. Reels 1-151. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotl and.Original data: 18;).
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90 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1851. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1851. Data imaged f rom the National A;)
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95 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1861 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1861 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S9)
 
96 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1871 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1871. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged f rom the National A;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1871 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1871. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged f rom the National A;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S10)
 
97 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1871 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2007;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1871 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2007;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S11)
 
98 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1891 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1-409. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census . Reels 1-409. Genera;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1891 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1-409. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census . Reels 1-409. Genera;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S12)
 
99 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1901 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census . Reels 1-446. Genera;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1901 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census . Reels 1-446. Genera;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S13)
 
100 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Australia Birth Index, 1788-1922 (Name: Online publicatio n - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Original data - C ompiled from publicly available sources.Original data: Compiled from pu blicly available sources.;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Australia Birth Index, 1788-1922 (Name: Online publicatio n - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Original data - C ompiled from publicly available sources.Original data: Compiled from pu blicly available sources.;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S18)
 

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