Blyth Genealogy Pages

The genealogy of the Blyth familys of Whanganui and Temuka

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51 It appears that was married in two parishes on two different dates - ma ybe to accommodate family. Both parishes are next to each other and the d etails match up
TEXT: _WEBTAG
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ROBERTSON, James (I1135)
 
52 James Austin and Mary, along with Mary´s 12 year old sister Agnes, arri ved in New Zealand aboard the Zelandia which left London (10 Sep 1863) a nd arrived in Lyttelton (8 Dec 1863) Under Captain Foster. They came ou t in Second Cabin.
Also An Agnes Rainey appears in the Will of James SHanks being at his d eath resididing in Canterbury NZ 
SHANKS, Agnes (I1127)
 
53 JAMES BLYTH and ANN LAING
James, the son of David Blyth and Janet Anderson, was born in Cupar, Fi feshire, in 1802. However he was not christened until 16th June 1817.

As a young man he traveled to South America. From early in 1830 until J anuary 1836 he worked as a carpenter, joiner and cabinetmaker in Lima, P eru. The British Consul General in Peru, Belford Hinton Wilson, was so i mpressed with James that he wrote him a reference praising his “unimpea chable honesty, sobriety and persevering industry''

After six years in Peru, which included involvement in a rebellion and t he war with Bolivia, James returned to Scotland where on 24 February 19 40 in Cupar, he married Ann Laing, daughter of James Laing and Catherin e Anderson.

On 6th November 1841, with their 7-month-old son David, James and Ann s ailed for New Zealand on the “Martha Ridgway” via the Cape of Good Hope . Records of the ship show that it was built in Liverpool in 1840 and w as “sheathed in felt and yellow metal.” It was described as a “splendid s hip constructed expressly for the passenger trade.” She had a “very spa cious poop” and was “replete with every arrangement for the comfort and h ealth of the passengers.” The 621 ton sailing ship made its maiden voya ge to New Zealand captained by Henry Webb, and after a tempestuous jour ney, arrived in Nelson on 7th April 1842. James gave his occupation at t he time as a joiner. The family later disembarked at Petone, less than t wo years after the settlement of Wellington. The Martha Ridgway meet an u ntimely end that same year (1842) when on a trip from New Zealand to Bo mbay she was wrecked on a reef in the Torres Strait.

For some years James was a businessman in Wellington. On October the 16 th, 17th, 19th and 24th of 1848 Wellington was rocked by earthquakes. W ard's book ‘Early Wellington', describing houses affected by the quakes m entions James's two storied clay house in Dixon street as being “much s haken with one gable down.”

During his time in Wellington James was a member of the first “Kirk ses sion” of the Church of Scotland which occurred in 1853.

James appears on the Burgess Roll for the Borough of Wellington in 1842 , is shown on the list of persons qualified to serve as jurors for the D istrict of Port Nicholson for 1848 and 1856, and is on the City of Well ington electoral Roll, as a Cabinet Maker of Dixon Street, up until 185 8. The Burgess Roll, by way of explanation, was a record of all men gra nted the freedom of the city. It was an ancient Scottish honor which, a mong other things, granted the holder a share in government.

At some time after the birth of his youngest child (Herbert in 1861) Ja mes purchased a 2,000 acre property and homestead in the recently settl ed Whanganui area. He named the homestead “Marybank” in honor of his dau ghter Mary who coincidentally had been born the same year as the home w as completed. The homestead had been built by David Strachan from Kahik atea timber cut and pit sawn on site. It was of a double-gabled design w ith a front verandah.

The move to Whanganui would have been a major undertaking in those days a s the country had not long been ‘opened up’ and the threat from maraudi ng bands of Maori was very real.
With true pioneering spirit James entered into the local community dete rmined to establish a viable settlement. He was the first Chairman of t he Whangaehu School Committee, a member of the Provincial Council, a Ju stice of the Peace and an elder of the Presbyterian Church. He was no d oubt a well-respected member of the community.

On the evening of 8th October 1862, less than two years after moving to t he area, while returning from visiting the Campbell family at nearby ‘W iritoa,' James was thrown from his horse and killed.
On his death the properties “Marybank” at Putiki, and “Blythwood” at Ta ylorville, were leased out. When Ann died in 1886 the properties were d ivided up between the couples nine children.

JAMES BLYTH and ANN LAING
James, the son of David Blyth and Janet Anderson, was born in Cupar, Fi feshire, in 1802. However he was not christened until 16th June 1817.

As a young man he traveled to South America. From early in 1830 until J anuary 1836 he worked as a carpenter, joiner and cabinetmaker in Lima, P eru. The British Consul General in Peru, Belford Hinton Wilson, was so i mpressed with James that he wrote him a reference praising his “unimpea chable honesty, sobriety and persevering industry''

After six years in Peru, which included involvement in a rebellion and t he war with Bolivia, James returned to Scotland where on 24 February 19 40 in Cupar, he married Ann Laing, daughter of James Laing and Catherin e Anderson.

On 6th November 1841, with their 7-month-old son David, James and Ann s ailed for New Zealand on the “Martha Ridgway” via the Cape of Good Hope . Records of the ship show that it was built in Liverpool in 1840 and w as “sheathed in felt and yellow metal.” It was described as a “splendid s hip constructed expressly for the passenger trade.” She had a “very spa cious poop” and was “replete with every arrangement for the comfort and h ealth of the passengers.” The 621 ton sailing ship made its maiden voya ge to New Zealand captained by Henry Webb, and after a tempestuous jour ney, arrived in Nelson on 7th April 1842. James gave his occupation at t he time as a joiner. The family later disembarked at Petone, less than t wo years after the settlement of Wellington. The Martha Ridgway meet an u ntimely end that same year (1842) when on a trip from New Zealand to Bo mbay she was wrecked on a reef in the Torres Strait.

For some years James was a businessman in Wellington. On October the 16 th, 17th, 19th and 24th of 1848 Wellington was rocked by earthquakes. W ard's book ‘Early Wellington', describing houses affected by the quakes m entions James's two storied clay house in Dixon street as being “much s haken with one gable down.”

During his time in Wellington James was a member of the first “Kirk ses sion” of the Church of Scotland which occurred in 1853.

James appears on the Burgess Roll for the Borough of Wellington in 1842 , is shown on the list of persons qualified to serve as jurors for the D istrict of Port Nicholson for 1848 and 1856, and is on the City of Well ington electoral Roll, as a Cabinet Maker of Dixon Street, up until 185 8. The Burgess Roll, by way of explanation, was a record of all men gra nted the freedom of the city. It was an ancient Scottish honor which, a mong other things, granted the holder a share in government.

At some time after the birth of his youngest child (Herbert in 1861) Ja mes purchased a 2,000 acre property and homestead in the recently settl ed Whanganui area. He named the homestead “Marybank” in honor of his dau ghter Mary who coincidentally had been born the same year as the home w as completed. The homestead had been built by David Strachan from Kahik atea timber cut and pit sawn on site. It was of a double-gabled design w ith a front verandah.

The move to Whanganui would have been a major undertaking in those days a s the country had not long been ‘opened up’ and the threat from maraudi ng bands of Maori was very real.
With true pioneering spirit James entered into the local community dete rmined to establish a viable settlement. He was the first Chairman of t he Whangaehu School Committee, a member of the Provincial Council, a Ju stice of the Peace and an elder of the Presbyterian Church. He was no d oubt a well-respected member of the community.

On the evening of 8th October 1862, less than two years after moving to t he area, while returning from visiting the Campbell family at nearby ‘W iritoa,' James was thrown from his horse and killed.
On his death the properties “Marybank” at Putiki, and “Blythwood” at Ta ylorville, were leased out. When Ann died in 1886 the properties were d ivided up between the couples nine children.

From THE PAMPHLET COLLECTION OF SIR ROBERT STOUT: VOLUME 76

Whanganui OLD SETTLERS

Blyth, James.-This gentleman was an early settler and resided at "Mary B ank" about four miles from the town on the No. 1 Line of road. Mr. Blyt h was a Justice of the Peace and Member of the Provincial Council, and a s taunch supporter of the late Dr. Featherston, Superintendent of the Wel lington Province. He came to an untimely end, however, having been thro wn from his horse whilst riding home after dark one evening, his body b eing picked up by the roadside afterwards by a search party. Mr. Blyth w as much respected and his death deeply regretted.

PAPERS PAST NZ (NZ Archives), MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
Wellington Independent, Volume XVI, Issue 1791, 13 November 1862, Page 3

The Late Mr. James Blyth. - Many of our readers will peruse with feelin gs of sincere regret, the following extract from the Whanganui Chronicle o f the 9th October, narrating the sudden and untimely death of Mr. James B lyth. The deceased gentleman had many friends in Wellington, as well as i n other Provinces of New Zealand, and for some years was an elder in th e Free Church of Scotland here, and in common with many others, we take t he opportunity afforded by the present mournful occasion, to pay a pass ing tribute of respect to the memory of the departed : - " It is with g reat pain that we record the sudden decease of Mr. James Blyth, of Mary bank. Mr. Blyth was returning home last night, from Dr. Allison's, acco mpanied by his two eldest sons. He was riding on before, and they follo wed a short way behind, When they arrived at the gate leading up to the h ouse, they found the horse standing at it without its rider. Returning i n search of their father, they found him lying in a ditch at the side o f the road near Wiritoa Mill, quite dead. The body was carried into Mr. W m. Howie's house, and Dr. Gibson sent for, who found that death had bee n caused by the bursting- of a blood vessel in the brain, and that it m ust therefore have been instantaneous. No person in the district had a w ider and more attached circle of friends than Mr. Blyth, by all of whom h is death will be deplored, as occasioning the loss of a most excellent m ember of society, a most genial companion, a warm-hearted friend, and a c onsistent Christian. To his amiable widow and family this sudden bereav ement must be especially distressing, as from Mr. Blyth's constitution a nd habits, they might naturally have looked for a long continuance of t heir domestic felicity
.

(Research):See attached sources. 
BLYTH, James (I2)
 
54 James Blyth:Autpbiographical Notes
Mr James Blyth was born In Newport, Fifeshire, Scotland on 15th May 183 7. He was educated at the Presbyterian School in his native town, and a t the Grammar School, St Andrews. On leaving school he was apprenticed t o a Master-Builder in order to learn the trade of a carpenter.
At the end of his four year apprenticeship he was retained as a journey man carpenter and continued to serve his employer in that capacity for six months, and then decided to leave the land of his birth for far New Z ealand.
He left London on fifth October, 1858, in the ship “Strathallan” of five hundred and forty tons register. The passengers numbered two hundred and thirty-five souls including thirty-two children. The immigrants included farm laborers, general laborers, gardeners, shepherds, blacksmith carpenters, sawyers, bricklayers, tailors, painters, domestic servants and dressmakers. The voyage was full of interest. The French coast was sighted on the morning of the 17th and shortly afterwards the rough weather so often encountered in the Bay of Biscay was experienced. The weather was stormy with a high sea running and sea-sickness was general among the passengers. Running into finer weather they eventually reached he tropics and the ship became becalmed in the Doldrums. Fishing was in dulged in here. A twelve months old shark was caught by the first mate, nd the following morning the passengers were regaled with shark for breakfast fried in butter, and for tea on the same day shark stewed in vinegar. In order to interest those on board a ship's newspaper was published periodically, being usually read after dinner. As occasion offered, there were concerts, dances, deck games and entertainments by a scrach band. Very dirty weather was encountered in southern latitudes, and dur ng time there was a good deal of bickering, discontent and fighting taking place among members of the Crew. During the voyage two woman and s x children died and there were three births. On the morning of January 13th, New Zealand was distinctly visible and on a bearing taken at noon, it was calculated that the ship was thirty-five miles from land. The Ship arrived of Timaru on 14th January, 1859. Timaru in those days was nothing but a whaling station. The buildings consisted of five houses, Mr hodes’s wool shed and an Accommodation house kept by Sam Williams. The country was a wilderness of tussock and flax. Owing to a lack of accommodation, James Blyth spent the first few nights under a flax bush with no other covering but for a blanket, and he continued the outdoor night life for a month.
Two days after arrival he met Mr David Innes was in partnership with W lliam Harrison in Pareora Station, a block of country of 25000 acres just south of the Pareora river. Mr Innes engaged James Blyth as a carpenter to co-operate with two other tradesmen in the construction of a wool-shed and house on that part of the run now known as Holme station, the wages being 12s6d a day and found. On the completion of the wool-shed and the partial construction of the house, there was a shortage of timb r, and rather than stand idle the carpenters left but agreed to return later to complete the work. James Blyth went down to the Waimate bush where he helped to build a sheep-dip and wash, and later built a dairy at Waihao for a former employee of Mr Innes. On finishing this work, he decided to see some of the countryside and he thereupon commenced a long walk to Dunedin. On reaching the Waitaki, he was faced with the difficulty of getting to the other side of the river in order to continue his tramp. Meeting a Maori, he discussed his difficulty and the native suggested the construction of a raft of koradi sticks and flax. Together they built a raft six feet by four feet, and the Maori poled the new colonist across the river. Navigation was difficult and tricky owing to the rapidly flowing water; but the native proved himself a past-master with the pole. On reaching the other side, the Maori declined to accept anything for the service he had rendered, and it was only after repeated efforts that Blyth prevailed on him to accept half a Sovereign for his trouble. The Waitaki plain was then a regular plaster of cabbage trees and flax. The Maori gave the pioneer directions as to his route, informing that after walking six miles he would reach Mr Filluel’s sheep station. He stayed at the station that night and walked into Oamaru, a distance of four miles, the following morning. Oamaru then consisted of a blacksmith’s shop, a carpenter’s shop and a few houses, the first hotel being at that time under construction. The traveller here inquired the way to Dunedin and continued on the even tenor of his way. The following morning he fell in with two sailors who had deserted from a ship previously when at Port Chalmers and who where then walking back to Port Chalmers ith a view securing a job on a returning vessel. The journey to Dunedin occupied a week. The party stayed one night with the Maoris at Waikoiti and slept out other nights. On reaching Port Chalmers they made a stay of one night at the hotel, and the following morning the party took passage in a boat to Dunedin. In 1859, Dunedin was a very small place, a couple of hotels, a few houses and several shops constituting the town at that time. James Blyth stayed here for a month then took passage for Oamaru on the steamer “Geelong”. On reaching Oamaru he proceeded on foot to a ford on the Waitaki river called Jimmy-the-needle’s crossing. He had to disgorge the sum of £1 in advance before Jimmy would put him across the river. A good swimming pony carried him across the river, and he then walked to Pike’s station, about eight miles north of the river, and stayed there the night. The following day he walked to Pareora Station, a distance of forty miles, and finding that additional supplies of timber had been secured by Messrs. Harris and Innes he resumed work the following morning and two months later had completed the work.
James Blyth tendered for the construction of a house for Mr W.K. Macdonald, 0rari Station, and secured the contract. It was a house of five rooms which was liked up with the original slab house. It was completed to Mr Macdonald’s entire satisfaction in 1860. This was the beginning of James Blyth's association with W.K. Macdonald, but was destined to cover a number of years during which Mr Blyth Carried out extensive work for Mr Macdonald.
Whilst James Blyth had the construction of W.K. Macdonald's the house in hand, he met the lady who was to be the sharer joys and sorrows over a long period of happy wedded life. Miss Alice Dunn the daughter of Thomas D unn who had a farm at Orari called the Stumps.
On the completion of Macdonald's house James Blyth decided that he would give the "diggings" a go. He rode from Timaru up through the Lindus Pass to the diggings. He joined two other men in the working of a claim, put in plenty of work during a very hard winter there but without any luck, and returned to Timaru. He then commenced business as a Master-Builder and carried out extensive work in town and country. On 2nd May, 1863, he was united in Holy Matrimony with Alice Dunn at her father's home , The Stumps, Orari, the ceremony being performed by the first Anglican Vicar of Geraldine, the Rev. Lawrence Brown. The happy couple made their home in Timaru and continued to reside there for three years. Mr Blyth then secured a building contract at Orari and other contracts in the same location following which the Blyth's decided to move to Orari in order that Mr Blyth would be more conveniently placed to carry out the work . He purchased twenty acres of land on which he built a house which they made their home until the children became of school age when he sold out of the Orari property and returned to Timaru. The family lived in Timaru for several years, but the ever increasing contracts offering in Temuka town and district brought about another move and he came to Temuka in 1873 to make the town his permanent hone. In 1875 he decided to e large the sphere of his operations and to this end he commenced business as a Timber and Hardware merchant. A Man of substance, he began to take an active interest in municipal matters and played a prominent part in the formation and development of the town. For years he was chairman o f the Temuka Town Board, and he has been a Justice of the Peace for a long period of years.
He has been an enthusiastic worker in the Presbyterian Church and gave of his best in all things calculated to further its good work. In 1894 he made a trip to the old country where he travelled a great deal before returning to New Zealand. In June 1922, after a happy association extend ing over fifty-nine years, a partnership commenced on 2nd May 1863 came to an end when Mrs Blyth passed away. Shortly after the sad event Mr Blyth retired from business in order to enjoy remaining years of life in peace and quiet. Well over ninety years of age, he is a living testimony t o the inestimable benefits gained by a life of rectitude and hard work

The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District]
Old Colonists

Mr. James Blyth, J.P., was born in Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1837, a nd s erved an apprenticeship to the building trade. He came to Timaru by t h e Strathallan,in 1859, and followed his trade until 1861, when he trie d , his fortune on the Otago goldfields. Returning to Timaru, he carried o n b usiness as a builder for some years, and settled in Temuka in 1872. I n 1 880 he commenced business as a timber, coal, and iron mer chant. His p r emises occupy an acre and a-half of ground in Wood Street, where he als o has a large grain store. Mr. Blyth is district agent for the National I nsurance Company. He has taken a leading part in all movements for the w elfare of the district, and was associated with the Temuka Pioneers ' M emorial, which was erected in commemoration of the Record Reign, and wa s unveiled by Mrs. Blyth on the 16th of December, 1897. He was made a J ustice of the Peace in 1897. Mr. Blyth is a member of the Masonic frat r nrity, and also of the Alexanda Lodge of Oddfellows, American order , i n which he has occupied all the chairs and has been for years treasurer o f of the lodge. He was one of the first members of the Temuka Town Boar d, of which he was chairman from 1890 to 1894. Mr. Blyth was married in 1 862 to the eldest daughter of Mr. Thos. Dunn, of The Stumps farm, Orari , and has three sons and three daughters. 
BLYTH, James (I17)
 
55 James Hibbert Wanklyn was in Manchester business house of
Bradshaw, Hibbert & Wanklyn and li ved at Crumshall Hall. He
married his first cousin Margaret Bradshaw. James Hibbert
Wanklyn , the eldest son of William Wanklyn, merchant of
Manchester, born on the 4th August 1797, wa s a Brazilian
merchant, and in 1850 resided at Crescent, Salford. He served
the office of ch urchwarden of Manchester in 1828, and took
part in the management of the Manchester infirmary , and other
public charities, and was one of the original trustees and
patrons of St. Luke' s Church, Cheetham Hill, as well as a
magistrate of the county. He married, in 1823 or 24 Ma rgaret
Bradshaw, and left surviving issue, one Hibbert Wanklyn, now
vicar of Deopham, Norfolk . Mr J. H. Wanklyn died on the 18th
of October 1870 in his 74th year, having resided with hi s son
during the last two years of his life.
Mark Wanklyn 
WANKLYN, James Hibbert (I518)
 
56 Jane Nelson was baptised at St Mary Gate Independent Chapel, Nottingham , E ngland, on 29 April 1801, daughter of James Nelson and his wife, Ann a M aria Dale. Her parents were Dissenters. In 1817 Jane was engaged as a p u pil teacher by Mary Williams at her school in Southwell, Nottinghamshi r e. There she met Mary's son William, an ordained minister, who was pre p aring for missionary work in New Zealand. Despite Anna Nelson's initia l d iscouragement Jane and William were married at Sheffield, on 11 July 1 8 25, and on 12 August sailed in the Sir George Osborne. On 25 March 182 6 t hey arrived at Paihia, where William's brother Henry, and his wife, M a rianne, had established a mission station.
Jane and Marianne Williams worked as well together as did the two broth e rs. Both women were often pregnant, Jane having six daughters and thre e s ons by 1846. The families shared meals and the two wives took turns a t c ooking and teaching. This close family bond was maintained after Wil li am and Jane left the Bay of Islands to set up a mission station at Tu r anga, Poverty Bay, in 1840. Children were frequently exchanged, and th e l etters between the two women are now one of the main sources of info rm ation about the minutiae of daily life at Paihia and Turanga.
Jane Williams, especially instructed by the Church Missionary Society i n L ondon to remember that 'no country can be happy or Christian but in p r oportion as its Females become so', was to seek every opportunity of i n fluencing Maori women. She taught them to read and write, to sew and c o ok (in European fashion), and trained them in 'civilised' household ma n agement. Like her husband she took a special care in visiting the sick . A t Paihia girls who had been making 'satisfactory progress' were ofte n t aken away by their relatives to serve the shipping which frequented t h e Bay of Islands. There was little danger of this at Turanga, but ther e w as always some doubt as to whether her girls would turn up, because t r ibal demands took precedence.
To Turanga Maori, irrespective of age, Jane Williams was 'Mother'. The s h aring of household tasks and of childbirth gave Jane and the Maori peo p le an intimacy which was closer than that between male missionary and c o nvert. When William Williams was away, the smooth running of the missi o n devolved on Jane, who was also responsible for the day-to-day teachi n g of her younger children. She was an efficient person who had to bear w i th constant domestic interruptions of a sort seldom suffered by her hu s band. Days of 'very great raru' (hindrances and encumbrances) figure f r equently in her journals. Quiet evenings with her husband and family s h e particularly valued, but often William was away for weeks or months a t a t ime. 'These continual separations form my greatest trial', she wro te i n 1844, 'I try to remember that I am a soldier's wifeÉ. Still I can not b ut feel it.'
After leaving Turanga in 1865 for the Bay of Islands, Jane and William s e ttled at Napier in 1867, where she took a lively interest in the Hukar e re school for Maori girls, established close to her home by her husban d i n 1875. After William's death on 9 February 1878 Jane was one of the l a st survivors of the missionary band of the 1820s. Reminiscing in 1880 s h e wrote, 'we were always contented and happy... never even dreamt of t h e land being occupied by Europeans. Civilization was good for our chil d ren, but sadly marred our work.' She died at her residence, Hukarere, o n 6 O ctober 1896. Her obituary stated: 'The treasure William Williams b roug ht to these shores was that bright, intelligent, courageous and che erf ul soul'.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Jane Nelson was baptised at St Mary Gate Independent Chapel, Nottingham , E ngland, on 29 April 1801, daughter of James Nelson and his wife, Ann a M aria Dale. Her parents were Dissenters. In 1817 Jane was engagedas a p u pil teacher by Mary Williams at her school in Southwell, Nottinghamshi r e. There she met Mary's son William, an ordained minister, who was pre p aring for missionary work in New Zealand. Despite Anna Nelson's initia l d iscouragement Jane and William were married at Sheffield, on 11 July 1 8 25, and on 12 August sailed in the Sir George Osborne.On 25 March 1826 t h ey arrived at Paihia, where William's brother Henry, and his wife, Mar i anne, had established a mission station.
Jane and Marianne Williams worked as well together as did the two broth e rs. Both women were often pregnant, Jane having six daughters and thre e s ons by 1846. The families shared meals and the two wives took turns a t c ooking and teaching. This close family bond was maintained after Wil li am and Jane left the Bay of Islands to set up a mission station at Tu r anga, Poverty Bay, in 1840. Children were frequently exchanged, and th e l etters between the two women are now one of the main sources of info rm ation about the minutiae of daily life at Paihia and Turanga.
Jane Williams, especially instructed by the Church Missionary Societyin L o ndon to remember that 'no country can be happy or Christian but in pro p ortion as its Females become so', was to seek every opportunityof infl u encing Maori women. She taught them to read and write, to sewand cook ( i n European fashion), and trained them in 'civilised' household managem e nt. Like her husband she took a special care in visiting the sick. At P a ihia girls who had been making 'satisfactory progress' were often take n a way by their relatives to serve the shipping which frequented the Ba y o f Islands. There was little danger of this at Turanga, but there was a l ways some doubt as to whether her girls would turnup, because tribal d e mands took precedence.
To Turanga Maori, irrespective of age, Jane Williams was 'Mother'. The s h aring of household tasks and of childbirth gave Jane and the Maori peo p le an intimacy which was closer than that between male missionary and c o nvert. When William Williams was away, the smooth running of the missi o n devolved on Jane, who was also responsible for the day-to-day teachi n g of her younger children. She was an efficient person who had to bear w i th constant domestic interruptions of a sort seldom suffered by her hu s band. Days of 'very great raru' (hindrances and encumbrances) figure f r equently in her journals. Quiet evenings with her husband and family s h e particularly valued, but often William was away forweeks or months a t a t ime. 'These continual separations form my greatest trial', she wro te i n 1844, 'I try to remember that I am a soldier's wifeÉ. Still I can not b ut feel it.'
After leaving Turanga in 1865 for the Bay of Islands, Jane and William s e ttled at Napier in 1867, where she took a lively interest in the Hukar e re school for Maori girls, established close to her home by her husban d i n 1875. After William's death on 9 February 1878 Jane was oneof the l a st survivors of the missionary band of the 1820s. Reminiscing in 1880 s h e wrote, 'we were always contented and happy... never even dreamt of t h e land being occupied by Europeans. Civilization was good for our chil d ren, but sadly marred our work.' She died at her residence, Hukarere, o n 6 O ctober 1896. Her obituary stated: 'The treasure William Williams b roug ht to these shores was that bright, intelligent,courageous and chee rfu l soul'.
_WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/
BIRT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/[[Category: New Zealand Colonists]]
{{Migrating Ancestor
| origin = Great Britain
| destination = New Zealand
| origin-flag = Flags-3.jpg
| destination-flag = Flags-19.png
}}
== Biography ==

Entered by Gary Williams.

== Sources ==

Family Records

=== Footnotes ===



=== Acknowledgments ===
Thanks to [[Fear-34|Gary Williams]] for starting this profile. Click the Changes tab for the details of contributions by Gary and others. 
NELSON, Mrs Jane (I28)
 
57 MARR: _PRIM Y Family F111
 
58 Marriages performed at the Parish Church of BOCONNOC, Cornwall Thomas L ane of Blisland & Ann Wherry o.t.p. by B(banns) 6 May 1795 Both (s)
"Lean" and "Weary" witnesses, George Motton, Joseph Parson

Tombstone inscription in Blisland churchyard: This stone erected to th e memory of Thomas Lean who died December 2nd 1826, aged 56 years also A nn wife of the above who died at Pendavey, Egloshayle February 20th 185 5, aged 81 years also Jemima their daughter who died May 5th 1857, age d 53 years also Jane Bate who died September 10th 1835, aged 23 years 
LEAN, Thomas (I989)
 
59 Married At Saint Peter and St Pauls Church, Parish Of Ashton Family F30
 
60 New Zealand Marriage Index, 1840–1950. Microfiche. Source (S118)
 
61 NOt sure if this is the same robert Lean as why would get married in De von. need more evidence to back this up Family F22
 
62 OBJE: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://genealogy.eproject.co.nz/ 
BILLING, Thomas (I93)
 
63 Reference: Cyclopedia of New Zealand, Canterbury edition. Vol. 3 pages 9 18 Published 1903

OHAPE is seventeen miles to the north of Timaru in the county of Gerald ine. It is within five miles of Temuka, and has a bi-weekly mail servi ce with Timaru. The district is devoted to farming. has a public school a nd a blacksmith shop.

FARMERSº

AUSTIN, James, Farmer, Ohape, near Temuka. Mr Austin was born in Count y Down, Ireland, in 1837, and was brought up as a farmer by his father. H e came to Lyttelton in 1864 by the ship "Zealandia," and after farming f or three years at Selwyn, removed to Temuka in 1867 - just before the h eavy flood in that district. Mr Austin has a number of farms, and in a ddition to cereal growing, is a breeder of sheep and cattle at one tim e he owned a stud of Clydesdale horses. He was married in the Old Coun ty and has eleven children.

James and Mary Austin arrived in Lyttleton, New Zealand from County Dow n Ireland on December 8th, 1863 as paying passengers. They bought a far m at Winchester, South Canterbury after 3 years in the Selwyn District. G randfather lived by the rules he set. If a man was worthy of his hire, h e was fit to sit at table with the family. He had 11 in the family, fin anced four sons and two son-in-laws into farms. Bought houses for them w hen they married. Daughters (single) had an income for life and then on t heir death, this income was equally divided among his 28 Grandchildren. M oney invested in his daughter´s farms was held in trust to be equally d ivided among their respective families at their death…Grandfather sold a 2 8 acre farm or was a tenant on it to come to New Zealand in 1863 and af ter some years had 6000 acres in South Canterbury and Mid-Canterbury. T wo farms are still in the family. Grandmother was a teacher and a beaut iful sewer.´´
Extracts from a letter written by Agnes Kelly (née Connolly) May 1995 
AUSTIN, James (I119)
 
64 Robert Robertson And Margeret Robertson, of Aberdeenshire in Scotland a nd their six daughters left Glasgow on the 30 May 1860 aboard the ship S S Henrietta, arriving in Dunedin on the 24th September 1860. According t o the Otago Colonist Newspaper it was an eventfull voyage with several d eaths on board on the way due to rampant disease, including Robert Robe rtson as well as nine others. As a result Margeret Robertson and her si x daughters, including Christina Buchan Robertson, who was only 1 year o ld arrived alone on our shores, the legend of which continues in our fa mily today. HENRY, Margeret (I224)
 
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BLYTH, James (I494)
 
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TIPPING, Mary (I228)
 
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KINGDON, Jonathan (I83)
 
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HENWOOD, Rebecca (I84)
 
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KINGDON, Elizabeth (I92)
 
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Robertson, James (I1143)
 
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Robertson, George (I1142)
 
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Robertson, Isabel (I1141)
 
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CLARK, Janet (I1136)
 
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Clark, James (I1138)
 
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Robertson, Elizabeth (I1140)
 
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Gray, Isabel (I1139)
 
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WILLIAMS, Margeret Ellen (I48)
 
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AUSTIN, Carroll Dorothy (I14)
 
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LEAN, Richard (I75)
 
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MCAVENEY, Jannett (I234)
 
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WILSON, Margaret (I702)
 
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WILSON, Jane (I134)
 
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WANKLYN, Sarah (I33)
 
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WANKLYN, John Bradshaw (I133)
 
98 The Proof that James Stewart and Margeret Richardson moved from Kelso to Berwick llies in the Baptisim records of Robert Stewart, their eldest son that clearly states that while Robert was born in Kelso (see Souce from familysearch) he was baptised in Berwick-upon-Tweed STEWART, James (I407)
 
99 There ARE two marriage entries for the same day for William Robertson a nd Christian Wilson in the parish entrys for the parishes of Udny and F overan. In the Entry for the parish of Foveran it states that Willam Ro bertson is of the parish of Udny, and in the parish records for Udny it m ay state (cant read writing) that the entruys were added later, but as i t is exactly the same date it can be assumed with some degree o cerntai nty that this is the same event entered twice, unless there is other ev idence that surfaces later to contridct this ROBERTSON, William (I280)
 
100 There is evidence to sugest that Charls and Isabella died sometime shor tly after the birth of their youngest daugther as the census record wou ld suggest that she was living with Aunts? at the age of 7 at the time o f the census REID, Charles (I197)
 

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