Blyth Genealogy Pages

The genealogy of the Blyth familys of Whanganui and Temuka

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101 WEDDING BELLS

BLYTHE- HUNTER. On Tuesday morning, November 26tb, a large circle of fr iends assisted at a very pretty and interesting function at Burnside. t he residence of Mrs Moore Hunter. The event was the marriage of her dau ghter Jeanie to Mr David Blythe, of Whanganui. Tbe bridal party was grou ped for the ceremony in the porch, which was decorated for the occasion , and formed a novel and effective picture, the ministers and guests oc cupying the lawn. The bride looked sweet and dignified in a rich dress o f white brocaded satin, the only trimming being a deep fall of Honiton l ace and a spray of orange blossom on the bodice. The veil was delicatel y embroidered. The bride carried a lovely shower bouquet, and was atten ded by her three sisters. Miss Millie Hunter, as chief bridesmaid, wore a d ress of white silk with daffodil yellow chiffon sash, also a gold bangl e, the gift of the bridegroom and carried a bouquet of yellow and whlt e flowers. Misses Belle and Mary wore cream silk dresses and dainty gol d necklets and lockets, the bridegroom's gifts, and carried baskets of c rimson roses. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr A. Hunter and t he bridegroom was attended by his brother, Mr J. Blythe, as best man. T he ceremony was performed by Rev T. McDonald of Waipukurau, assisted by R ev I. E. Bertram. After a sumptuous breakfast, Rev T. McDonald, in a sh ort speech, voiced the feeling of the assembled company in wishing Mr a nd Mrs Blythe happiness and prosperity. Mr Blythe shortly returned than ks on behalf of himself and his wife. The wedding-cake was handsome and i mposing, having three tiers most elaborately decorated. The bride's tra velling dress was a coat and skirt of fine blue cloth, lined with white s atin. She wore a white chiffon boa, and Black hat with two cloth-of-gol d roses under the brim, in which she looked charming. Mr and Mrs Blythe l eft by train for Nelson. The presents were numerous and costly, and cam e from far and near.

Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLII, Issue 7369, 30 November 1901, Page 3 
HUNTER, Jeannie (I20)
 
102 WEDDING BELLS

BLYTHE- HUNTER. On Tuesday morning, November 26tb, a large circle of fr iends assisted at a very pretty and interesting function at Burnside. t he residence of Mrs Moore Hunter. The event was the marriage of her dau ghter Jeanie to Mr David Blythe, of Whanganui. Tbe bridal party was grou ped for the ceremony in the porch, which was decorated for the occasion , and formed a novel and effective picture, the ministers and guests oc cupying the lawn. The bride looked sweet and dignified in a rich dress o f white brocaded satin, the only trimming being a deep fall of Honiton l ace and a spray of orange blossom on the bodice. The veil was delicatel y embroidered. The bride carried a lovely shower bouquet, and was atten ded by her three sisters. Miss Millie Hunter, as chief bridesmaid, wore a d ress of white silk with daffodil yellow chiffon sash, also a gold bangl e, the gift of the bridegroom and carried a bouquet of yellow and whlt e flowers. Misses Belle and Mary wore cream silk dresses and dainty gol d necklets and lockets, the bridegroom's gifts, and carried baskets of c rimson roses. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr A. Hunter and t he bridegroom was attended by his brother, Mr J. Blythe, as best man. T he ceremony was performed by Rev T. McDonald of Waipukurau, assisted by R ev I. E. Bertram. After a sumptuous breakfast, Rev T. McDonald, in a sh ort speech, voiced the feeling of the assembled company in wishing Mr a nd Mrs Blythe happiness and prosperity. Mr Blythe shortly returned than ks on behalf of himself and his wife. The wedding-cake was handsome and i mposing, having three tiers most elaborately decorated. The bride's tra velling dress was a coat and skirt of fine blue cloth, lined with white s atin. She wore a white chiffon boa, and Black hat with two cloth-of-gol d roses under the brim, in which she looked charming. Mr and Mrs Blythe l eft by train for Nelson. The presents were numerous and costly, and cam e from far and near.

Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XLII, Issue 7369, 30 November 1901, Page 3 
Family F69
 
103 Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life the p a st of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero. A sto r y filled with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered important back - up equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome and unloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only other option was to m a nually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. He returned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behind a s ta ck of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fu e l.
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets. Se v eral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting in th e d amage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighters cou ld h ave returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. T h e lives of the remaining crews depended on the swift departure of the s u rviving plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using their fallen com r ades as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austin later repli e d to this thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books and un i forms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobs sca r ce. Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an exciting pros p ect for many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he would enjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in these countr i es, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently the planes we r e stripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d i scarded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course. Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded the O r der of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to go hom e a nd watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thought that b l oke’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So into my litt l e ute, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and h e lped pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, was he hot. The am bu lance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to ho s pital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat every time he choked. O f ten wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, then on a b o at to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life thepa s t of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero.A stor y f illed with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered importantback- u p equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome andunloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only otheroption was to m an ually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. Hereturned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behinda st ac k of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fue l .
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets.Sev e ral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting inthe d a mage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighterscould h a ve returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. The l i ves of the remaining crews depended on the swift departureof the survi v ing plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using theirfallen comr a des as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austinlater replied t o t his thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books anduni f orms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobsscarc e . Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an excitingprospec t f or many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he wouldenjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in thesecountri e s, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently theplanes wer e s tripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d is carded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course.Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded theOr d er of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to gohome a n d watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thoughtthat blo k e’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So intomy little u t e, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and hel p ed pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, washe hot. The amb ul ance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to hos p ital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat everytime he choked. Of t en wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, thenon a b oa t to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.
Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life the p a st of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero. A sto r y filled with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered important back - up equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome and unloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only other option was to m a nually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. He returned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behind a s ta ck of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fu e l.
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets. Se v eral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting in th e d amage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighters cou ld h ave returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. T h e lives of the remaining crews depended on the swift departure of the s u rviving plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using their fallen com r ades as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austin later repli e d to this thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books and un i forms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobs sca r ce. Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an exciting pros p ect for many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he would enjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in these countr i es, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently the planes we r e stripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d i scarded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course. Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded the O r der of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to go hom e a nd watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thought that b l oke’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So into my litt l e ute, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and h e lped pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, was he hot. The am bu lance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to ho s pital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat every time he choked. O f ten wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, then on a b o at to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Weekly Feature - 1 November 2003
A remarkable story finally shared with family
The death of John Austin-Smith, of Masterton, has brought to life thepa s t of a humble but quite extraordinary man. JOSEPH WALLACE spoke with h i s family and discovered the exceptional story of a wartime hero.A stor y f illed with humour, intrigue, action and history.
DURING World War II, in September 1943, the Allied Navy captured the is l and of Cos in the Aegean Sea. Not long after this success, pilot John A u stin Henry Smith and the crew of squadron 267 delivered importantback- u p equipment and supplies to the battle-weary navy.
The squadron loaded their DC3s and left the Ramat David airport in Isra e l, heading for the small island just off the southwest coast of Turkey . T he four unarmed supply planes slipped undetected through Turkey’s ne ut ral south coast before Austin and his squadron landed successfully at C o s airstrip. The four planes spread out over the aerodrome andunloaded t h e naval provisions. Austin finished and returned to his cabin to prepa r e for the departing flight. He settled into the cockpit and attempted t o s tart the motors. They refused to turn. The only otheroption was to m an ually crank the motors from outside the aircraft. Hereturned to the t a rmac and began cranking. That’s when he heard five Luftwaffe ME109 fig h ters.
The German fighters began a strafing run over the airstrip showering th e i sland with enemy fire. Austin-Smith ran for cover, diving behinda st ac k of unidentified drums, soon discovering they were containers of fue l .
He escaped the petrol explosion, but the attack left three planes utter l y annihilated. Two were aflame, the other was riddled with bullets.Sev e ral men, who were most likely known to Austin, were killed. His crew a n d the surviving crew of the destroyed planes picked their friends bodi e s from the tarmac and retreated to the only plane intact.
Austin quickly looked over his aircraft, checking for damage. He discov e red the plane was hit. The left wing was shot through, resulting inthe d a mage of a foot-wide sheet of its structure. The German fighterscould h a ve returned at any time and Austin knew it was not safe to linger. The l i ves of the remaining crews depended on the swift departureof the survi v ing plane.
He acted fast. Leaving the tarmac, Austin climbed on to the wing and ri p ped the shot piece away and discarded it. The aircraft was loaded and e n gines cranked. Austin piloted his wounded DC3 away from the damaged ai r strip and away from the carcasses of the other three planes. Once Aust i n had flown out of immediate danger, he returned to the cabin to check h i s passengers. They were fine, playing cards and using theirfallen comr a des as seats to make the journey more comfortable. Austinlater replied t o t his thought: “Such is the way of warfare.”
John Austin-Smith was known in Masterton for setting up Austins Pharmac y , which was situated in a building on a corner of Queen and Perry stre e ts, now occupied by Sounds Music.
To locals he was a nice guy who was a keen golfer known as Austin. Aust i n’s obituary stated - “NZ402474 RNZAF. 90 Squadron, 267 Squadron. Spec i al OPS, ME Order of the Crown of Yugoslavia 1942, DFC 1943.” An extrao r dinary history to be briefly mapped out in a small column of the paper .
Inquiries led to a 30-page book.
Apparently Austin never mentioned the war. Until, aged 82, he was convi n ced by his family to tell his experience and put it on paper. What eve n tuated was titled Memories of an Airman. J.A.H. Austin-Smith. In it wa s r ecorded the career of a wartime hero as he told it. A straightforwar d a nd simple account of Austin-Smith’s recollection of his time in Worl d W ar II.
Austin grew up in Dannevirke. His family were poor and financially stre t ched through the Depression. His parents struggled to buy books anduni f orms for him to go to college. Money was in short supply and jobsscarc e . Subsequently, when World War II broke out, it was an excitingprospec t f or many young men, including a young Austin aged 19.
He applied for the air force and managed to join by telling a few white l i es. Austin said he almost missed out on the air force altogether becau s e his urine test failed. He immediately called upon his healthier brot h er to help out and sent a second sample. His brother passed this test a n d Austin was in turn accepted in July 1940.
Over the next eight months he trained throughout New Zealand before he a n d his friends were shipped away to Canada aboard SS Awatea. Austin des c ribed the Awatea journey as “the life of luxury” where he wouldenjoy “ f ive or six-course meals”. He liked it so much he said he thought: “Wow , i f this is war, wiz oh, I’m all for it”. Over the next few months Aus ti n trained in Canada before he once again departed, this time for Engl a nd. In England he was prepared as a pilot of the RAF.
Austin continued training and was assigned to the new Liberator convers i on unit, which was to be sent on a special operations job in the Middl e E ast. He spent only five hours training in the Liberators before he a nd h is crew were sent on a long flight to a new base in Fayid. At the t ime , Greece and Yugoslavia lacked communications, the Allies had no met eo rological or navigational information from the ground in thesecountri e s, making flights over this airspace extremely dangerous.
Austin and his squadron’s mission was to fly the two Liberators into th e se fragile conditions dropping wireless operators, saboteurs and suppl i es to the partisans who lived in the mountains of German-occupied Gree c e and Yugoslavia. It was a difficult ask as Liberators were 50-ton sup p ly planes only lightly armed and requiring a lot of petrol for the lon g f lights from Fayid to Yugoslavia and back. They had to pack as much e qu ipment and men on each flight as possible. Consequently theplanes wer e s tripped of non-essential weight - 95 percent of the ammunition was d is carded, leaving only 100 rounds in the rear gun turret. Austin said: “ W e were flying all night over enemy territory in aircraft that were lit e rally defenceless. It was a cat-and-mouse operation.”
The Liberator crews had to be elusive and get out of enemy territory by d a ybreak or they were prime targets. But the enemy wasn’t the only dange r . One particular night Austin flew into cloud that was full of “severe i c ing” over the Aegean Sea. The Liberator’s instruments immediately froz e a nd he became disorientated in the thick cloud. He was unaware of his a l titude and unsure if he was going straight or off course.Although the a u topilot was on, Austin said his instinct was to take the stick and alt e r its level. But this action could be deadly. Instead, Austin refused t h e itch to grab the controls and stood up from his seat to feel the sit u ation. Everything felt normal, so he waited it out while de-icing heat e rs kicked in. It remained this way for some minutes for what must have b e en an eternity. Eventually the instruments came back after an intensel y -nervous wait for Austin in his blind, drifting aircraft.
Despite numerous dangers including the weather, anti-aircraft ground fi r e and enemy fighters, Austin wrote: “The thing that caused us the most c o ncern was a bloody star! Venus!”. It was often mistaken for an enemy p l ane. Austin said he knew of some gunners shooting off a few precaution a ry rounds at the planet, just in case.
Eventually, after numerous trips, wireless communication enabled the Li b erators to receive weather forecasts and news of the success of their d r ops. The flights were known to be some of the most arduous flights und e r extremely difficult conditions. Austin finished these operations wit h 4 46 hours of flying. He flew 19 trips to Yugoslavia and 13 drops into G r eece.
In recognition for the flights into Yugoslavia Austin was awarded theOr d er of the Crown of Yugoslavia on October 20, 1942. This was followed w i th one of the highest honours awarded to pilots, the Distinguished Fly i ng Cross.
Austin and his crew were taken off transport duty in October 1943. The o d ds must have been in his favour as he was still alive after this exten s ive period - of the 56 men he trained with during the early stage of t h e war in Canada, only 15 returned home. Perhaps a little luck was on h i s side. “Fate played strange tricks in those weird days,” he said.
Austin was assigned to instructing other pilots how to fly large transp o rt planes. During the course of one morning Austin finished up instruc t ing another pilot in a Liberator. He finished the lesson and landed fo r b reakfast. His good friend, Squadron Leader Rolph-Smith, took over th e j ob and took the Liberator up for another lesson. During the plane’s f i rst circuit it struck a Hurricane that was coming into land, it sliced o f f the Liberator’s tail. “All were killed instantly.” Austin returned t o f ind he was promoted to squadron leader.
Despite the war and all the experiences that came with it, Austin’s Mem o ries are filled with amusing moments. One is when his good friend thro u ghout the war, Jacko Madill, sent Christmas correspondence to his fath e r expressing that he was in need of money. His father replied by sendi n g him a Christmas cake that hid the only reliable currency at the time - g o ld sovereigns.
Unfortunately, Jacko’s aunts were also keen to help their nephew’s war e f fort. In which case several cakes arrived for Jacko courtesy of his do t ing aunties. The mass of cakes camouflaged the true identity of the “r i chest cake”. Austin was called on and together they hacked up several C h ristmas cakes until they struck gold.
The war ended in August 1944 and Austin was posted home. He wrote of on e o f his last experiences - it happened as he was getting ready to retu rn t o New Zealand. “ I’d finished for the day, was packing up to gohome a n d watching the Liberators coming in to land, at night. Thoughtthat blo k e’s low! He was, the next second , CRASH and flames. So intomy little u t e, tore up the road about a quarter mile, ran across a paddock and hel p ed pull one guy away from the burning wreck. He’d hit something, had n o r oof to his mouth and of course no teeth. And boy, washe hot. The amb ul ance arrived, popped him in and I sat on his tummy all the way to hos p ital trying to dig his teeth out of his throat everytime he choked. Of t en wonder what happened to him. Poor devil.”
The next day Austin left for home. He returned via Morocco to Britain, o n t o the Queen Mary, which shipped him to New York where he remained fo r s ix weeks before training across America to San Francisco, thenon a b oa t to Noumea before reaching New Zealand.
John Austin-Smith left his home town at the age of 19. He travelled the w o rld and experienced the highs and lows of war, and the comradeships th a t were made and lost. He said the memories he made lived in him foreve r : “They are events I will never forget and experiences and friendships o n ly war can provide”. He returned home a humble, decorated hero. As a w a rtime pilot he amassed a total of 1715 flying hours. John Austin-Smith p a ssed away last month aged 83.
TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=93427436 
AUSTIN-SMITH, John Austin Henry (I4)
 
104 William (1766) and his family lived near Dixton, a village near Monmou th on the Welsh border . John Bradshaw a merchant travelling on busine ss took a fancy to young William Wanklyn and offered him work and took h im to Manchester. The Wanklyns come from the Hereford Worcester area. W illiam married John Bradshaw's daughter Sarah in 1796 or 1797 at St. Jo hns Church ,
Deansgate, Manchester and lived on Quay Street. They ran a business by t he name of Bradshaw, Hibbert & Wanklyn (JohnBradshaw, James Hibbert and W illiam Wanklyn). They established business interests in Buenos Aires, A rgentina and most of the family spent time down there. Johnny Wanklyn a m ember of the family still farms in Argentina. James Hibbert Wanklyn, W illiam James Wanklyn's dad was named after James Hibbert and of course t his is where Hibbert come s from in the family.
Mark Wanklyn 
WANKLYN, William (I135)
 
105 Witherslack Church Family F9
 
106 [[Category: New Zealand Colonists]]

'''OBITUARY'''
Bishop W. L. Williams, late Bishop of Waiapu, and one of the oldest pioneer missionaries of New Zealand, died at his home "Taumata," Hukarere road, Napier, at 7.30 last evening, death resulting from heart failure supervening a bronchial cold contracted some three weeks ago. The deceased, who was born in 1829, was a son of the first Bishop of Waiapu.
After receiving his early education in the Bay of Islands and St. John's College, Auckland, he graduated at Oxford (England), taking the degree of B.A., with third class honours in Literas Humanioribus, in 1852. The following year he returned to New Zealand as a missionary, joining his father, whose headquarters were then at Poverty Bay.
In 1862 Mr. Williams was installed Archdeacon of Waiapu and continued to labour among the Maoris until 1865 when the Poverty Bay Mission was broken up in consequence of the incursions of the Hauhaus. 'The Archdeacon took his family to the Bay of Islands and later to Auckland. He returned to Napier in 1872 and resided there with his family until 1877. Notwithstanding the very unsettled condition of the natives he himself spent most of his time in the neighbourhood of Poverty Bay in spite of many obstacles and warnings. He was there with portion of his family when the Chatham Island prisoners led by Te Kooti, landed at Whareongaonga, and was within a few miles of the scene of the massacre on November 10, 1868. In 1877 he made Gisborne his headquarters, where in the year 1883 the Maori Theological College was placed under his charge as principal. He continued in this position until the resignation of Bishop Stuart of the Waiapu see, was elected to fill the vacancy in 1894 and consecrated the following year at Napier Cathedral by the Primate, assisted by the Bishops of Christchurch, Nelson and Melanesia. This position he held until June, 1909, when he found that the weight of years was beginning to hinder him and he resigned. Bishop Averill succeeded him. The year prior to his resigning Bishop Williams visited England.
Since resigning deceased has continued taking an active interest in the church work of the province. He and all of the Diocesan Synods in Napier.
In Maori literature the late bishop has done much useful work. He has re-edited the "Dictionary of the Maori Language," compiled by his father and is the author of "First Lessons in Maori." Some of his papers have been published in the proceedings of the New Zealand Institute, notably one of "Cook's Landing in Poverty Bay," and one exposing the falsehood of the story of John Rutherford.
As the head of the church in the diocese of Waiapu he was very greatly loved and revered, and under his guidance and influence the churches of the diocese stood as a power for good and the advancement of religion.
After an absence of 44 years from the land of his forefathers, Bishop Williams revisited England and the scene of his University career during the Record Reign celebrations and the sitting of the Lambeth Conference. He was warmly welcomed to his old University which conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. Dr. Williams spent four or five months in England and spoke highly on his return of the unvarying kindness with which he was everywhere received as a New Zealand Bishop and the eldest son of one who had, more than seventy years before, placed his life at the disposal of the Church Missionary Society as a volunteer for missionary work, in what was then one of the wildest, most savage and least known countries of the world.
The late Bishop married the daughter of Mr. John Bradshaw Wanklyn, of Witherslack, Westmoreland, in 1853. He leaves behind him four daughters and five sons. His wife predeceased him many years ago.
Deceased's eldest son, Mr. F. W. Williams, is the senior managing director of Williams and Kettle, Ltd. The second son the Rev. Herbert W. Williams, is Archdeacon of Waiapu. The remaining sons are Mr. Alfred Williams, surgeon at Harrow, Middlesex, England; Mr. Frank J. Williams, sheep farmer, Gisborne and Mr. Arthur Williams, engineer, in England. The daughters are Mrs. Charles Gray, of Gisborne, Mrs. McLean, Mrs. A. F. Gardiner, and Miss Williams.
The day before the Bishop's death was the anniversary of the day he was baptised with a number of Maori infants at the Bay of Islands.

''Hastings Standard, Volume VI, Issue 215, 25 August 1916''

BURIAL PLACE - Old Napier Hill Cemetery : Northern block 1 plot 4

The marriage was registered 1853 in Kendal, Westmorelandclick here to see online in Familysearch ["England and Wales, Marriage Registration Index, 1837-2005," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/2641-564 : accessed 18 February 2015), Sarah Wanklyn, 1853; from “England & Wales Marriages, 1837-2005,” index, findmypast (http://www.findmypast.com : 2012); citing Marriage, Kendal, Westmorland, England, General Register Office, Southport, England.]

Nevil Harvey-Williams writes - the marriage was celebrated at Witherslack Church on June 6th, 1853. (Cumbria, U.K.)
click here (http://www.williams.gen.nz/18and19c.html)
W.L.W. was rarely known as William, but as'' Leonard''. He William Leonard Williams, and his father William were both very high profile Bishops, and hence also the necessity to distinguish.

== Sources ==* 'FAITH AND FARMING, the legacy of Henry Williams and William Williams'. 720pp. Copyright Rex Evans, Evagean Publishing 1998. ISBN-1-877194-53-0
* [http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast Papers Past NZ.]
* [https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Williams&GSfn=William&GSby=1829&GSbyrel=in&GSdy=1916&GSdyrel=in&GSob=n&GRid=67014384&df=all& Find A Grave record for William Leonard Williams]
* [http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31234/31234-h/31234-h.htm#img020 The Project Gutenberg eBook, A History of the English Church in New Zealand], by Henry Thomas Purchas 
WILLIAMS, Bishop William Leonard (I32)
 
107 [[Category:1931 Hawke's_Bay_earthquake]]
== Biography ==

Died as a result of the 1931 Napier Earthquake.

== Sources ==
* 'Faith and Farming, the legacy of Henry Williams and William Williams' (a 720p family record), copyright Rex Evans, Evagean Publishing 1998. ISBN-1-877194-53-0* "Births, Deaths & Marriages Online", [digital index], New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs (http://www.bdmhistoricalrecords.dia.govt.nz).** Death Registration / 1931/960 / Name: Williams, Lydia Catherine / Aged: 89Y 
WILLIAMS, Lydia Catherine "Kate" (I39)
 
108 _SUBQ: "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (http s://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTFY-PL4 : 2 January 2015), Thomas Bl ythe, 24 Mar 1806; citing , Cupar, Fife, Scotland, reference 2:15BZ5JK; F HL microfilm 1,040,101.
_BIBL: "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (http s://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTFY-PL4 : 2 January 2015), Thomas Bl ythe, 24 Mar 1806; citing , Cupar, Fife, Scotland, reference 2:15BZ5JK; F HL microfilm 1,040,101.
_TMPLT:
 
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109 _SUBQ: (http://www.archives.presbyterian.org.nz/marriageregisters)
_BIBL: (http://www.archives.presbyterian.org.nz/marriageregisters).
_TMPLT:

_BIBL: http://www.archives.presbyterian.org.nz/marriageregisters.
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110 _SUBQ: 1841 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: A ncestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.Original data - Census Returns of Eng land and Wales, 1841. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of th e UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the Nati onal;)
_BIBL: 1841 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: A ncestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.Original data - Census Returns of Eng land and Wales, 1841. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of th e UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the Nati onal;).
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111 _SUBQ: Ancestry Family Trees (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ances try.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry membe rs.;)
_BIBL: Ancestry Family Trees (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ances try.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry membe rs.;).
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112 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1841 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - 1841 S cotland Census. Edinburgh, Scotland: General Register Office for Scotla nd. Reels 1-151. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotl and.Original data: 18;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1841 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - 1841 S cotland Census. Edinburgh, Scotland: General Register Office for Scotla nd. Reels 1-151. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotl and.Original data: 18;).
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113 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1851. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1851. Data imaged f rom the National A;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1851. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1851. Data imaged f rom the National A;).
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114 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1851 Scotland Census (Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; L ocation: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1851 Scotland Census (Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; L ocation: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;).
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115 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1851 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - Scotla nd. 1851 Scotland Census. Reels 1-217. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1851 Scotland Census . Reels 1-217. Genera;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1851 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - Scotla nd. 1851 Scotland Census. Reels 1-217. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1851 Scotland Census . Reels 1-217. Genera;).
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116 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1861 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1861. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1861. Data imaged f rom The National A;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1861 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1861. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1861. Data imaged f rom The National A;).
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117 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1861 Scotland Census (Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; L ocation: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1861 Scotland Census (Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; L ocation: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;).
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118 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1861 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1861 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;).
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119 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1871 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1871. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged f rom the National A;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1871 England Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - Census R eturns of England and Wales, 1871. Kew, Surrey, England: The National A rchives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged f rom the National A;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S10)
 
120 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1871 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2007;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1871 Scotland Census Records (Name: Ancestry.com Operatio ns Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2007;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S11)
 
121 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1891 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1-409. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census . Reels 1-409. Genera;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1891 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1-409. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census . Reels 1-409. Genera;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S12)
 
122 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, 1901 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census . Reels 1-446. Genera;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, 1901 Scotland Census Records (Name: Online publication - P rovo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data - Scotla nd. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scot land, Edinburgh, Scotland.Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census . Reels 1-446. Genera;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S13)
 
123 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Australia Birth Index, 1788-1922 (Name: Online publicatio n - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Original data - C ompiled from publicly available sources.Original data: Compiled from pu blicly available sources.;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Australia Birth Index, 1788-1922 (Name: Online publicatio n - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Original data - C ompiled from publicly available sources.Original data: Compiled from pu blicly available sources.;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S18)
 
124 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957 (Name: Onl ine publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008-201 1.Original data - View all sources.Original data: View all sources;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957 (Name: Onl ine publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008-201 1.Original data - View all sources.Original data: View all sources;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S22)
 
125 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, England & Wales Christening Records, 1530-1906 (Name: Onl ine publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.Ori ginal data - Genealogical Society of Utah. British Isles Vital Records I ndex, 2nd Edition. Salt Lake City, Utah: Intellectual Reserve, copyrigh t 2002. Used by permission.Original dat;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, England & Wales Christening Records, 1530-1906 (Name: Onl ine publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.Ori ginal data - Genealogical Society of Utah. British Isles Vital Records I ndex, 2nd Edition. Salt Lake City, Utah: Intellectual Reserve, copyrigh t 2002. Used by permission.Original dat;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S30)
 
126 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, England & Wales, Non-Conformist and Non-Parochial Registe rs, 1567-1970 (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT , USA; Date: 2013;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, England & Wales, Non-Conformist and Non-Parochial Registe rs, 1567-1970 (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT , USA; Date: 2013;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S35)
 
127 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906 - LONDON (Name: O nline publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010 .Original data - Board of Guardian Records, 1834-1906 and Church of Eng land Parish Registers, 1754-1906. London Metropolitan Archives, London. Images produced by permission of the City;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906 - LONDON (Name: O nline publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010 .Original data - Board of Guardian Records, 1834-1906 and Church of Eng land Parish Registers, 1754-1906. London Metropolitan Archives, London. Images produced by permission of the City;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S39)
 
128 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921 (Name: On line publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data - Church of England Parish Registers, 1754-1921. London M etropolitan Archives, London.Images produced by permission of the City o f London Corporation Libraries, Archives;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921 (Name: On line publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data - Church of England Parish Registers, 1754-1921. London M etropolitan Archives, London.Images produced by permission of the City o f London Corporation Libraries, Archives;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S59)
 
129 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 154 1-1812 (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; D ate: 2013;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 154 1-1812 (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; D ate: 2013;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S61)
 
130 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 157 3-1812 (Cathedral) (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Prov o, UT, USA; Date: 2013;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 157 3-1812 (Cathedral) (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Prov o, UT, USA; Date: 2013;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S62)
 
131 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Deaths and Burials, 1813-1985 (Name: A ncestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2013;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Deaths and Burials, 1813-1985 (Name: A ncestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2013;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S63)
 
132 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1930 (Cath edral) (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT; Date: 2 013;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Manchester, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1930 (Cath edral) (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT; Date: 2 013;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S64)
 
133 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, New Zealand Army WWI Nominal Rolls, 1914-1918 (Name: Ance stry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, New Zealand Army WWI Nominal Rolls, 1914-1918 (Name: Ance stry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.;).
_TMPLT:

Ancestry.com. New Zealand Army WWI Nominal Rolls, 1914-1918 [database o n-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. 
Source (S68)
 
134 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, New Zealand Army WWI Nominal Rolls, 1914-1918 (Name: Ance stry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2010;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, New Zealand Army WWI Nominal Rolls, 1914-1918 (Name: Ance stry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2010;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S69)
 
135 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, New Zealand Army WWI Reserve Rolls, 1916-1917 (Name: Onli ne publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Or iginal data - New Zealand Expeditionary Force Reserve – 1916-1919. Mic rofiche 1-23. BAB Microfilming, Auckland, New Zealand..Original data: N ew Zealand Expeditionary Force Reserve;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, New Zealand Army WWI Reserve Rolls, 1916-1917 (Name: Onli ne publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Or iginal data - New Zealand Expeditionary Force Reserve – 1916-1919. Mic rofiche 1-23. BAB Microfilming, Auckland, New Zealand..Original data: N ew Zealand Expeditionary Force Reserve;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S70)
 
136 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, New Zealand, Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981 (Name: Online pub lication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Original d ata - New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853–1981. Auckland, New Zealand: BA B microfilming. Microfiche publication, 4032 fiche.Original data: New Z ealand Electoral Rolls, 1853–19;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, New Zealand, Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981 (Name: Online pub lication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Original d ata - New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853–1981. Auckland, New Zealand: BA B microfilming. Microfiche publication, 4032 fiche.Original data: New Z ealand Electoral Rolls, 1853–19;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S73)
 
137 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Northern Ireland, Will Calendar Index, 1839-1943 (Name: A ncestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2013;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Northern Ireland, Will Calendar Index, 1839-1943 (Name: A ncestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2013;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S78)
 
138 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Nottinghamshire, England, Extracted Parish Records (Name: O nline publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.O riginal data - Electronic databases created from various publications o f parish and probate records.Original data: Electronic databases create d from various publications of parish and;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Nottinghamshire, England, Extracted Parish Records (Name: O nline publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.O riginal data - Electronic databases created from various publications o f parish and probate records.Original data: Electronic databases create d from various publications of parish and;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S79)
 
139 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Pallot's Marriage Index for England: 1780 - 1837 (Name: A ncestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2001;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Pallot's Marriage Index for England: 1780 - 1837 (Name: A ncestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2001;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S86)
 
140 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Public Member Trees (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; L ocation: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Public Member Trees (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; L ocation: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S92)
 
141 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960 (Name: Online publ ication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.Original da ta - Board of Trade: Commercial and Statistical Department and successo rs: Inwards Passenger Lists. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archive s of the UK (TNA). Series BT26,;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960 (Name: Online publ ication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.Original da ta - Board of Trade: Commercial and Statistical Department and successo rs: Inwards Passenger Lists. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archive s of the UK (TNA). Series BT26,;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S109)
 
142 _SUBQ: Ancestry.com, Web: International, Find A Grave Index (Name: Online publ ication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.Original d ata - Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg. cgi: accessed 15 February 2013.Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grav e. http://www.findagrave.com/cg;)
_BIBL: Ancestry.com, Web: International, Find A Grave Index (Name: Online publ ication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.Original d ata - Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg. cgi: accessed 15 February 2013.Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grav e. http://www.findagrave.com/cg;).
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S110)
 
143 _SUBQ: Archives NZ
_BIBL: Archives NZ.
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S16)
 
144 _SUBQ: Austin Document Extract
_BIBL: Austin Document Extract.
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S17)
 
145 _SUBQ: Blyth Family Bible
_BIBL: Blyth Family Bible.
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S19)
 
146 _SUBQ: BMD Non Parochial Records - England
_BIBL: BMD Non Parochial Records - England.
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S20)
 
147 _SUBQ: Boyd's Marriage Index 1538-1840 Transcription
_BIBL: Boyd's Marriage Index 1538-1840 Transcription.
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S21)
 
148 _SUBQ: Cherry Feisst, Gush Web Site
_BIBL: Cherry Feisst, Gush Web Site.
_TMPLT:

_UPD: 20 JUL 2013 22:13:37 GMT -0500
_TYPE: Smart Matching
_MEDI: 151702012-1 
Source (S49)
 
149 _SUBQ: CORNWALL PARISH RECORDS -BAPTISMS
_BIBL: CORNWALL PARISH RECORDS -BAPTISMS.
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S24)
 
150 _SUBQ: CORNWALL PARISH RECORDS- BURIALS
_BIBL: CORNWALL PARISH RECORDS- BURIALS.
_TMPLT:
 
Source (S25)
 

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