David Blyth Genealogy Pages

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1 (Research):Benjamin Maclean emigrated to New Zealand with his family departing fr o m L ondon in 1860 on the SS Rob Roy. Their youngest child Blanche re main ed i n England and was adopted by John and Mary Maclean. Geoffrey , son o f T homas Every Maclean accompanied them on the voyage.
Benjamin was appointed Auditor-General of Public Accounts for the Prov i n ce of Auckland, on 15 January 1863. Several other appointments fol lowe d , including Justice of the Peace. With his brother Every, he un dertook e x tensive farming operations in the Tamaki District.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Benjamin Maclean emigrated to New Zealand with his family departing fr o m L ondon in 1860 on the SS Rob Roy. Their youngest child Blanche re main ed i n England and was adopted by John and Mary Maclean. Geoffrey , son o f T homas Every Maclean accompanied them on the voyage.
Benjamin was appointed Auditor-General of Public Accounts for the Prov i n ce of Auckland, on 15 January 1863. Several other appointments fol lowe d , including Justice of the Peace. With his brother Every, he un dertook e x tensive farming operations in the Tamaki District.

Changed from Lean to Maclean to reclaim Scottish ancsestry 
MACLEAN, Benjamin (I50)
 
2 (Research):http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sooty/pioneer.htm

HUNTER, MARY nee MURRAY was born in 1851 in Glasgow, Scotla n d and came t o New Zealand in 1862. She was the daughter of James M urr ay, a tea mer chant, and Jane nee Blair. Mary married Moore Hunte r at W anganui in 18 74. Moore had a large property on the west sid e of Hawer a, and the fam ily lived at Burnside (now the A and P showg rounds). Th e Hunter family h ad considerable involvement in the earl y development o f the Hawera comm unity. Mary Hunter died on the 17 A ugust 1943 aged 9 2 years and is bur ied in the Hawera cemetery 
MURRAY, Mary (I206)
 
3 (Research):JAMES BLYTH and ANN LAING
James, the son of David Blyth and Janet Anderson, was born in Cupar, F i feshire, in 1802. However he was not christened until 16th June 1817 .

As a young man he traveled to South America. From early in 1830 unti l J anuary 1836 he worked as a carpenter, joiner and cabinetmaker in L ima, P eru. The British Consul General in Peru, Belford Hinton Wilson , was so i mpressed with James that he wrote him a reference praisin g his “unimpea chable honesty, sobriety and persevering industry''

After six years in Peru, which included involvement in a rebellion an d t he war with Bolivia, James returned to Scotland where on 24 Februa ry 19 40 in Cupar, he married Ann Laing, daughter of James Laing and C atherin e Anderson.

On 6th November 1841, with their 7-month-old son David, James and An n s ailed for New Zealand on the “Martha Ridgway” via the Cape of Goo d Hope . Records of the ship show that it was built in Liverpool in 18 40 and w as “sheathed in felt and yellow metal.” It was described a s a “splendid s hip constructed expressly for the passenger trade.” Sh e had a “very spa cious poop” and was “replete with every arrangemen t for the comfort and h ealth of the passengers.” The 621 ton sailin g ship made its maiden voya ge to New Zealand captained by Henry Webb , and after a tempestuous jour ney, arrived in Nelson on 7th April 184 2. James gave his occupation at t he time as a joiner. The family late r disembarked at Petone, less than t wo years after the settlement o f Wellington. The Martha Ridgway meet an u ntimely end that same yea r (1842) when on a trip from New Zealand to Bo mbay she was wrecked o n a reef in the Torres Strait.

For some years James was a businessman in Wellington. On October the 1 6 th, 17th, 19th and 24th of 1848 Wellington was rocked by earthquakes . W ard's book ‘Early Wellington', describing houses affected by the q uakes m entions James's two storied clay house in Dixon street as bein g “much s haken with one gable down.”

During his time in Wellington James was a member of the first “Kirk se s sion” of the Church of Scotland which occurred in 1853.

James appears on the Burgess Roll for the Borough of Wellington in 184 2 , is shown on the list of persons qualified to serve as jurors for t he D istrict of Port Nicholson for 1848 and 1856, and is on the City o f Well ington electoral Roll, as a Cabinet Maker of Dixon Street, up u ntil 185 8. The Burgess Roll, by way of explanation, was a record of a ll men gra nted the freedom of the city. It was an ancient Scottish ho nor which, a mong other things, granted the holder a share in governme nt.

At some time after the birth of his youngest child (Herbert in 1861) J a mes purchased a 2,000 acre property and homestead in the recently se ttl ed Wanganui area. He named the homestead “Marybank” in honor of hi s dau ghter Mary who coincidentally had been born the same year as th e home w as completed. The homestead had been built by David Stracha n from Kahik atea timber cut and pit sawn on site. It was of a double- gabled design w ith a front verandah.

The move to Wanganui would have been a major undertaking in those day s a s the country had not long been ‘opened up’ and the threat from ma raudi ng bands of Maori was very real.
With true pioneering spirit James entered into the local community det e rmined to establish a viable settlement. He was the first Chairman o f t he Whangaehu School Committee, a member of the Provincial Council , a Ju stice of the Peace and an elder of the Presbyterian Church. H e was no d oubt a well-respected member of the community.

On the evening of 8th October 1862, less than two years after moving t o t he area, while returning from visiting the Campbell family at near by ‘W iritoa,' James was thrown from his horse and killed.
On his death the properties “Marybank” at Putiki, and “Blythwood” at T a ylorville, were leased out. When Ann died in 1886 the properties wer e d ivided up between the couples nine children.

JAMES BLYTH and ANN LAING
James, the son of David Blyth and Janet Anderson, was born in Cupar, F i feshire, in 1802. However he was not christened until 16th June 1817 .

As a young man he traveled to South America. From early in 1830 unti l J anuary 1836 he worked as a carpenter, joiner and cabinetmaker in L ima, P eru. The British Consul General in Peru, Belford Hinton Wilson , was so i mpressed with James that he wrote him a reference praisin g his “unimpea chable honesty, sobriety and persevering industry''

After six years in Peru, which included involvement in a rebellion an d t he war with Bolivia, James returned to Scotland where on 24 Februa ry 19 40 in Cupar, he married Ann Laing, daughter of James Laing and C atherin e Anderson.

On 6th November 1841, with their 7-month-old son David, James and An n s ailed for New Zealand on the “Martha Ridgway” via the Cape of Goo d Hope . Records of the ship show that it was built in Liverpool in 18 40 and w as “sheathed in felt and yellow metal.” It was described a s a “splendid s hip constructed expressly for the passenger trade.” Sh e had a “very spa cious poop” and was “replete with every arrangemen t for the comfort and h ealth of the passengers.” The 621 ton sailin g ship made its maiden voya ge to New Zealand captained by Henry Webb , and after a tempestuous jour ney, arrived in Nelson on 7th April 184 2. James gave his occupation at t he time as a joiner. The family late r disembarked at Petone, less than t wo years after the settlement o f Wellington. The Martha Ridgway meet an u ntimely end that same yea r (1842) when on a trip from New Zealand to Bo mbay she was wrecked o n a reef in the Torres Strait.

For some years James was a businessman in Wellington. On October the 1 6 th, 17th, 19th and 24th of 1848 Wellington was rocked by earthquakes . W ard's book ‘Early Wellington', describing houses affected by the q uakes m entions James's two storied clay house in Dixon street as bein g “much s haken with one gable down.”

During his time in Wellington James was a member of the first “Kirk se s sion” of the Church of Scotland which occurred in 1853.

James appears on the Burgess Roll for the Borough of Wellington in 184 2 , is shown on the list of persons qualified to serve as jurors for t he D istrict of Port Nicholson for 1848 and 1856, and is on the City o f Well ington electoral Roll, as a Cabinet Maker of Dixon Street, up u ntil 185 8. The Burgess Roll, by way of explanation, was a record of a ll men gra nted the freedom of the city. It was an ancient Scottish ho nor which, a mong other things, granted the holder a share in governme nt.

At some time after the birth of his youngest child (Herbert in 1861) J a mes purchased a 2,000 acre property and homestead in the recently se ttl ed Wanganui area. He named the homestead “Marybank” in honor of hi s dau ghter Mary who coincidentally had been born the same year as th e home w as completed. The homestead had been built by David Stracha n from Kahik atea timber cut and pit sawn on site. It was of a double- gabled design w ith a front verandah.

The move to Wanganui would have been a major undertaking in those day s a s the country had not long been ‘opened up’ and the threat from ma raudi ng bands of Maori was very real.
With true pioneering spirit James entered into the local community det e rmined to establish a viable settlement. He was the first Chairman o f t he Whangaehu School Committee, a member of the Provincial Council , a Ju stice of the Peace and an elder of the Presbyterian Church. H e was no d oubt a well-respected member of the community.

On the evening of 8th October 1862, less than two years after moving t o t he area, while returning from visiting the Campbell family at near by ‘W iritoa,' James was thrown from his horse and killed.
On his death the properties “Marybank” at Putiki, and “Blythwood” at T a ylorville, were leased out. When Ann died in 1886 the properties wer e d ivided up between the couples nine children.

From THE PAMPHLET COLLECTION OF SIR ROBERT STOUT: VOLUME 76

WANGANUI OLD SETTLERS

Blyth, James.-This gentleman was an early settler and resided at "Mar y B ank" about four miles from the town on the No. 1 Line of road. Mr . Blyt h was a Justice of the Peace and Member of the Provincial Counc il, and a s taunch supporter of the late Dr. Featherston, Superintende nt of the Wel lington Province. He came to an untimely end, however, h aving been thro wn from his horse whilst riding home after dark one ev ening, his body b eing picked up by the roadside afterwards by a searc h party. Mr. Blyth w as much respected and his death deeply regretted.

PAPERS PAST NZ (NZ Archives), MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
Wellington Independent, Volume XVI, Issue 1791, 13 November 1862, Pag e 3

The Late Mr. James Blyth. - Many of our readers will peruse with feeli n gs of sincere regret, the following extract from the Wanganui Chroni cle o f the 9th October, narrating the sudden and untimely death of Mr . James B lyth. The deceased gentleman had many friends in Wellington , as well as i n other Provinces of New Zealand, and for some years wa s an elder in th e Free Church of Scotland here, and in common with ma ny others, we take t he opportunity afforded by the present mournful o ccasion, to pay a pass ing tribute of respect to the memory of the dep arted : - " It is with g reat pain that we record the sudden decease o f Mr. James Blyth, of Mary bank. Mr. Blyth was returning home last nig ht, from Dr. Allison's, acco mpanied by his two eldest sons. He was ri ding on before, and they follo wed a short way behind, When they arriv ed at the gate leading up to the h ouse, they found the horse standin g at it without its rider. Returning i n search of their father, the y found him lying in a ditch at the side o f the road near Wiritoa Mil l, quite dead. The body was carried into Mr. W m. Howie's house, and D r. Gibson sent for, who found that death had bee n caused by the burst ing- of a blood vessel in the brain, and that it m ust therefore hav e been instantaneous. No person in the district had a w ider and mor e attached circle of friends than Mr. Blyth, by all of whom h is deat h will be deplored, as occasioning the loss of a most excellent m embe r of society, a most genial companion, a warm-hearted friend, an d a c onsistent Christian. To his amiable widow and family this sudde n bereav ement must be especially distressing, as from Mr. Blyth's con stitution a nd habits, they might naturally have looked for a long con tinuance of t heir domestic felicity
.

See attached sources. 
BLYTH, James (I2)
 
4 1623? Kingdon, John (2) (I1096)
 
5 According to Census Records George Manson was A School Teacher eventua l y rising to the postion of Headmaster in Edinburgh MANSON, George (I530)
 
6 According to Death Cert search 77 years old at death CURRIE, William Purdie (I185)
 
7 According to family information Henry Williams was born on 11 Februar y 1 7 92; he was baptised on 13 April at Gosport, Hampshire, England . He was t h e fifth child and third son of Thomas Williams, a lace ma nufacturer, a n d his wife, Mary Marsh. His parents were relatively we ll off until the d e ath of his father in 1804. Two years later, at th e age of 14, Henry en t ered the Royal Navy as a midshipman, with aspi rations to be an officer . T he nearly 10 years that he spent in the n avy were far from easy; con di tions on naval vessels were extremely h arsh during the Napoleonic war s . Having seen active service in man y parts of the world he was dischar g ed from the navy in August 181 5 as a lieutenant on half pay. The last c a ptain under whom he serve d noted that he had behaved with diligence an d s obriety.
With the end of the Napoleonic wars unemployment, particularly among h a l fpay lieutenants, was very high; Henry had to find a new vocation . He w o rked for a while as a drawing master, but at the same time be gan to pr e pare himself for the mission field. His parents were Disse nters, and l i ke many missionaries who came from homes influenced b y evangelical Chr i stianity, he experienced a gradual conversion rath er than a sudden ill u mination. From about 1816 he came under the tut elage of his evangelica l b rother-in-law, Edward Marsh, a member of t he Church Missionary Socie ty a nd later vicar of Aylesford. But his f irm decision to become a miss ion ary was probably made after his marr iage to Marianne Coldham at Nune ha m Courtenay, Oxfordshire, on 20 Ja nuary 1818.
In 1819 Henry Williams offered his services to the CMS. He was accepte d f i rst as a lay settler, and then in 1820 as a missionary candidate . Alth o ugh Marsh thought that he had no 'great proficiency in the Gr eek and L a tin language', he was ordained a priest 'for the cure of s ouls in his m a jesty's foreign possessions' in 1822. Before leaving f or New Zealand h e a lso took instruction in the practical areas of me dicine, weaving, tw in ing, basket making, and, during the voyage out , shipbuilding. With Ma r ianne and three children he arrived at the B ay of Islands on the Bramp t on on 3 August 1823.
Henry Williams was severely tested during the early months in the Ba y o f I slands, as he assumed the leadership of a mission beset by pro blems. T h e CMS mission to New Zealand was nearly 10 years old when h e arrived, b u t not a single Maori had been converted. The missionari es were still l a rgely dependent on the Maori for food and supplies ; and under the lead e rship of Thomas Kendall and John Butler the mis sion had been torn apar t b y bitter personal disputes.
Having settled himself and his family at Paihia, Henry first attende d t o t he secular side of the mission. He wanted to reduce the missio naries ' i nvolvement with the trading captains of Kororareka (Russell ), to end t h eir dependence on the Maori for supplies, and most of al l he wanted to s t op the musket trade in which the missionaries had b een forced to engag e . He quickly imposed regulations on the missiona ries' trading, but it w a s the completion in 1826, under Henry's dire ction, of the 50 ton schoo n er Herald that really made the mission in dependent of local influences .
Meantime Henry had also put his mind to the spiritual aspect of missio n a ry work. He soon concluded that the mission had placed too much em phas i s on 'civilising' the Maori. In this he differed from Samuel Ma rsden, f o under of the mission, who had emphasised teaching useful ar ts and agri c ulture as a prelude to conversion. Henry argued that th e emphasis on s e cular instruction distracted the missionaries from t he far more import a nt task of bringing the Maori to Christianity. H e began to reorganise t h e mission so that more time could be devote d to spiritual teaching.
To better carry out this essential task, Henry argued that mission mem b e rs needed to spend more time learning the Maori language, preachin g to t h e tribes in the surrounding area, and teaching in the school s on the m i ssion stations; to do all these things most of the person nel would hav e t o be concentrated in one place. Paihia became the he adquarters and t he re the missionaries began by devoting regular amou nts of time to lear n ing Maori together. The arrival of Henry's broth er William, in 1826, g a ve a great impetus to this programme: all mem bers benefited from Willi a m's talent for languages. Having more miss ionaries at one station mean t t hat they were able to visit the surro unding villages more frequently a n d, as they became proficient in Ma ori, their preaching was more effect i ve. Schooling for Maori childre n was revitalised under Henry and his w i fe, Marianne, and more stude nts attended classes regularly. Working ef f ectively together fostere d harmonious relations among the missionaries t h emselves; Henry clai med that the Maori noticed their greater unity and p u rpose.
Henry Williams's forceful personality and discipline were perhaps as i m p ortant as his policies in reorganising the mission, and these char acte r istics also contributed to his growing mana among the Maori. Al though h i s capacity to comprehend the indigenous culture was severel y constrain e d by his evangelical Christianity, his obduracy was in s ome ways an ad v antage in dealings with the Maori. From the time of h is arrival he ref u sed to be intimidated by the threats and boisterou s actions of utu and m u ru plundering parties. By the late 1820s he f elt confident enough to i n tervene in intertribal disputes and on sev eral occasions was able to n e gotiate peace between hostile groups. S uch peacemaking was both a caus e a nd a consequence of his growing pr estige among the Maori. Only a per so n who was held in regard would b e invited to settle a conflict, and i t r equired even greater mana t o be successful. As his personal repute g re w, so did the influence o f the mission.
The 1830s were a decade of achievement and progress for Henry William s a n d the CMS mission. Success could be measured in two ways: increa sing n u mbers of Maori were baptised, and the Bay of Islands missio n was secur e e nough to provide a base for expansion throughout the N orth Island. T he re had been occasional baptisms in earlier years, bu t, beginning in 1 8 29--30, several Maori adults and children were bap tised at Paihia. By 1 8 42 over 3,000 Maori in the Bay of Islands are a had been baptised. No d o ubt Maori motives for 'going missionary' w ere often mixed and there wa s c onsiderable backsliding in later year s, but, as Maori conversions in cr eased, the missionaries were succes sful, at least in their own terms. T h eir growing confidence in the n orth enabled them to extend their opera t ions to the south. Here, too , Henry Williams played a leading role. He m a de several trips to oth er parts of the North Island to explore the pos s ibilities for expans ion, and directed the establishment of new mission s . He sent mission aries to begin work at several places in the Waikato d u ring the 1830 s, his brother William moved to Turanga, in Poverty Bay, a t t he en d of the decade, and stations were founded as far south as Otak i . B y 1840 Henry could look with considerable satisfaction on the achi e vem ents of the CMS mission since his arrival in 1823.
But 1840 was also a year of major changes, both for New Zealand and, a l t hough he did not appreciate it immediately, for Henry Williams. Wi th t h e country's annexation by Britain and a growing population of s ettlers , H enry became embroiled in racial conflict and caught up b y forces tha t w ere beyond his control. Rather than simply ministerin g to one race, h e w as drawn into the increasingly uncomfortable rol e of mediating betwe en t wo races.
The ambiguity of his position was apparent at the signing of the Treat y o f W aitangi in 1840. Henry translated the English draft of the tre aty in to M aori, and, at the meetings with the Crown's representative , William H o bson, at Waitangi, he explained its provisions to Maor i leaders. Later h e t ravelled to the west coast of the North Island , between Wellington a nd W anganui, and to the Marlborough Sounds t o persuade other Maori to s ign t he treaty. However, his Maori versio n of the treaty was not a lite ral t ranslation from the English draf t and did not convey clearly the c essi on of sovereignty. Moreover, i n his discussions with Maori leaders H en ry placed the treaty in th e best possible light and this, and his man a , were major factors i n the treaty's acceptance. Undoubtedly, therefor e , he must bear som e of the responsibility for the failure of the Treat y o f Waitangi t o provide the basis for peaceful settlement and a lastin g u nderstand ing between Maori and European.
As Maori-European relations deteriorated in the north in the early 184 0 s , Henry Williams tried to maintain peace between the races, as h e had d o ne earlier between tribes. In spite of his efforts the confl ict over l a nd and sovereignty soon moved beyond the possibility of c ompromise. Ha v ing failed to prevent hostilities he assisted the woun ded and helped e v acuate the beleaguered settlers when Hone Heke laun ched a final attack o n K ororareka in 1845. His close association wit h the Bay of Islands Mao ri p roduced accusations of disloyalty from E uropeans, while the station ing o f British troops at the Waimate miss ion created suspicion in the m inds o f some Maori. Other Maori accuse d him of misleading them in his e xplan ations of the treaty. Througho ut the conflict, as in later life, H enry a sserted that his missionar y vocation was paramount and that his p rimar y concern was for the Ma ori, but it was difficult to be single-min ded w hen he was assailed f rom all sides.
The arrival of George Grey to begin his first governorship in late 184 5 s o on led to Henry Williams's involvement in disputes of another ki nd. Du r ing the 1830s, mostly to provide some security for his growin g family, H e nry had purchased extensive tracts of land in the Tai-a- mai area, west o f P aihia. In dispatches to the Colonial Office tha t later became public , G rey questioned the validity of Henry's titl e to the land and falsely c l aimed that the landholdings of the CMS m issionaries were a cause of th e w ar in the north. Henry was oblige d to defend his land purchases and, m u ch more important as far as h e was concerned, his personal integrity a g ainst the governor's charg es. But he was fighting a losing battle agai n st a more powerful adve rsary. Henry's superior, Bishop G. A. Selwyn, s i ded with Grey, and i n 1849 the CMS in London, persuaded by Henry Willi a ms's critics, dec ided that Henry was too much of an embarrassment to r e main a membe r of the organisation.
His dismissal from the CMS that he had served for so long was a bitte r b l ow to Henry. Within a week of receiving the news in May 1850 h e left P a ihia and moved to Pakaraka, where his children were farmin g the land t h at was the source of so much trouble. He was still a pr iest in the Chu r ch of England and Selwyn had made him archdeacon o f Waimate in 1844; h e c ontinued to minister and preach to the Maor i in his locality and gat he red a considerable congregation around hi m. The injustice against him w a s only partly assuaged when he was re instated to the CMS in 1854.
Henry Williams's abiding concern for the Maori was apparent in his dis t r ess at the outbreak of warfare with the Pakeha again in 1860. In p riva t e correspondence he was critical of the government officials an d their p o licies, but he remained largely aloof from the public deba te about the w a r. In 1862 he wrote to his brother-in-law, Edward Mar sh: 'I feel our w o rk is drawing to a close; and were it not for th e Maories, I should ha v e relinquished all long since. But I feel bou nd to them'. After severa l y ears of deteriorating health, Henry Will iams died on 16 July 1867. H is p assing was perhaps most keenly fel t by the northern Maori among who m h e had lived for most of his life .

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

According to family information Henry Williams was born on 11 Februar y 1 7 92; he was baptised on 13 April at Gosport, Hampshire, England . He was t h e fifth child and third son of Thomas Williams, a lace ma nufacturer, a n d his wife, Mary Marsh. His parents were relatively we ll offuntil the d e ath of his father in 1804. Two years later, at th e age of14, Henry ent e red the Royal Navy as a midshipman, with aspir ations tobe an officer. T h e nearly 10 years that he spent in the nav y were farfrom easy; conditi o ns on naval vessels were extremely hars h during the Napoleonic wars. H a ving seen active service in many par ts of the world he was discharged f r om the navy in August 1815 a s a lieutenant on half pay. The last capta i n under whom he served no ted that he had behaved with diligence and so b riety.
With the end of the Napoleonic wars unemployment, particularly among h a l fpay lieutenants, was very high; Henry had to find a new vocation . He w o rked for a while as a drawing master, but at the same time be gan to pr e pare himself for the mission field. His parents were Disse nters,and li k e many missionaries who came from homes influenced by e vangelical Chri s tianity, he experienced a gradual conversion rathe r than a sudden illu m ination. From about 1816 he came under the tute lage of his evangelical b r other-in-law, Edward Marsh, a member of th e Church Missionary Society a n d later vicar of Aylesford. But his fi rm decision to become a missiona r y was probably made after his marri age to Marianne Coldham at Nuneham C o urtenay, Oxfordshire, on 20 Jan uary 1818.
In 1819 Henry Williams offered his services to the CMS. He was accepte d f i rst as a lay settler, and then in 1820 as a missionary candidate .Altho u gh Marsh thought that he had no 'great proficiency in the Gre ekand Lat i n language', he was ordained a priest 'for the cure of sou ls in his ma j esty's foreign possessions' in 1822. Before leaving fo r New Zealand he a l so took instruction in the practical areas of med icine, weaving, twini n g, basket making, and, during the voyage out , shipbuilding. With Maria n ne and three children he arrived at the B ay of Islands on the Brampton o n 3 A ugust 1823.
Henry Williams was severely tested during the early months in the Bayo f I s lands, as he assumed the leadership of a mission beset by proble ms. Th e C MS mission to New Zealand was nearly 10 years old when he a rrived, b ut n ot a single Maori had been converted. The missionarie s werestill la rge ly dependent on the Maori for food and supplies; an d underthe leader sh ip of Thomas Kendall and John Butler the missio n had beentorn apart b y b itter personal disputes.
Having settled himself and his family at Paihia, Henry first attendedt o t h e secular side of the mission. He wanted to reduce the missionar ies' i n volvement with the trading captains of Kororareka (Russell) , toend the i r dependence on the Maori for supplies, and most of al l he wanted to s t op the musket trade in which the missionaries had b een forced to engag e . He quickly imposed regulations on the missiona ries' trading, but it w a s the completion in 1826, under Henry's dire ction, of the 50 ton schoo n er Herald that really made the mission in dependent of local influences .
Meantime Henry had also put his mind to the spiritual aspect of missio n a ry work. He soon concluded that the mission had placed too much em phas i s on 'civilising' the Maori. In this he differed from Samuel Ma rsden, f o under of the mission, who had emphasised teaching useful ar ts and agri c ulture as a prelude to conversion. Henry argued that th e emphasis on s e cular instruction distracted the missionaries from t he far more import a nt task of bringing the Maori to Christianity. H e began to reorganise t h e mission so that more time could be devote d to spiritual teaching.
To better carry out this essential task, Henry argued that mission mem b e rs needed to spend more time learning the Maori language, preachin gto t h e tribes in the surrounding area, and teaching in the school s onthe mi s sion stations; to do all these things most of the personn el would have t o b e concentrated in one place. Paihia became the hea dquarters and ther e t he missionaries began by devoting regular amoun ts of time to learnin g M aori together. The arrival of Henry's brothe r William,in 1826, gave a g r eat impetus to this programme: all membe rs benefited from William's ta l ent for languages. Having more missio naries at one station meant that t h ey were able to visit the surroun ding villagesmore frequently and, as t h ey became proficient in Maori , their preaching was more effective. Sch o oling for Maori children w as revitalised under Henry and his wife, Mar i anne, and more student s attended classes regularly. Working effectivel y t ogether fostere d harmonious relations among the missionaries themsel ve s; Henry clai med that the Maori noticed their greater unity and purpo s e.
Henry Williams's forceful personality and discipline were perhaps as i m p ortant as his policies in reorganising the mission, and these char acte r istics also contributed to his growing mana among the Maori. Al though h i s capacity to comprehend the indigenous culture was severel y constrain e d by his evangelical Christianity, his obduracy was in s ome ways an ad v antage in dealings with the Maori. From the time of h is arrival he ref u sed to be intimidated by the threats and boisterou s actions of utu and m u ru plundering parties. By the late 1820s he f elt confident enough to i n tervene in intertribal disputes and on sev eral occasions was able to n e gotiate peace between hostile groups. S uch peacemaking was both a caus e a nd a consequence of his growing pr estige among the Maori. Only a per so n who was held in regard would b e invited to settle a conflict, and i t r equired even greater mana t o be successful. Ashis personal repute gr ew , so did the influence o f the mission.
The 1830s were a decade of achievement and progress for Henry William s a n d the CMS mission. Success could be measured in two ways: increa sing n u mbers of Maori were baptised, and the Bay of Islands missio n wassecure e n ough to provide a base for expansion throughout the No rth Island. Ther e h ad been occasional baptisms in earlier years, but , beginning in 1829 -- 30, several Maori adults and children were bapt ised at Paihia. By 184 2 o ver 3,000 Maori in the Bay of Islands are a had been baptised. No dou bt M aori motives for 'going missionary' w ere often mixed and there was c on siderable backsliding in later year s, but, as Maori conversions incre a sed, the missionaries were succes sful, at least in their own terms. Th e ir growing confidence in the n orth enabled them to extend their operat i ons to the south. Here, too , Henry Williams playeda leading role. He m a de several trips to othe r parts of the North Island to explore the pos s ibilities for expansi on, and directed the establishment of new mission s . He sent missiona ries to begin work at several places in the Waikato d u ring the 1830s , his brother William moved to Turanga, in Poverty Bay, a t t he end o f the decade, and stations were founded as far south as Otak i. B y 18 40 Henry could look with considerable satisfaction on the achie vem en ts of the CMS mission since his arrival in 1823.
But 1840 was also a year of major changes, both for New Zealand and, a l t hough he did not appreciate it immediately, for Henry Williams. Wi th t h e country's annexation by Britain and a growing population of s ettlers , H enry became embroiled in racial conflict and caught up b y forces tha t w ere beyond his control. Rather than simply ministerin g to onerace, h e w as drawn into the increasingly uncomfortable rol e of mediating betwe en t wo races.
The ambiguity of his position was apparent at the signing of the Treat y o f W aitangi in 1840. Henry translated the English draft of the tre aty in to M aori, and, at the meetings with the Crown's representative , William H o bson, at Waitangi, he explained its provisions to Maor i leaders. Later h e t ravelled to the west coast of the North Island , between Wellington a nd W anganui, and to the Marlborough Sounds t o persuade other Maori to s ign t he treaty. However, his Maori versio n of the treaty was not a lite ral t ranslation from the English draf t and did not convey clearly the c essi on of sovereignty. Moreover, i n his discussions with Maori leaders H en ry placed the treaty in th e best possible light and this, and his man a , were major factors i n the treaty's acceptance. Undoubtedly, therefor e , he must bear som e of the responsibility for the failure of the Treat y o f Waitangi t o provide the basis for peacefulsettlement and a lasting u n derstandi ng between Maori and European.
As Maori-European relations deteriorated in the north in the early 184 0 s , Henry Williams tried to maintain peace between the races, as h e had d o ne earlier between tribes. In spite of his efforts the confl ict over l a nd and sovereignty soon moved beyond the possibility of c ompromise. Ha v ing failed to prevent hostilities he assisted the woun ded and helped e v acuate the beleaguered settlers when Hone Heke laun ched a final attack o n K ororareka in 1845. His close association wit h the Bay ofIslands Maor i p roduced accusations of disloyalty from Eu ropeans, while the stationi ng o f British troops at the Waimate missi on created suspicion in the mi nds o f some Maori. Other Maori accuse d him of misleading them in his ex plan ations of the treaty. Througho ut the conflict, asin later life, Hen ry a sserted that his missionar y vocation was paramount and that his pri mar y concern was for the Ma ori, but it was difficult to be single-minde d w hen he was assailed f rom all sides.
The arrival of George Grey to begin his first governorship in late 184 5 s o on led to Henry Williams's involvement in disputes of another ki nd. Du r ing the 1830s, mostly to provide some security for his growin g family, H e nry had purchased extensive tracts of land in the Tai-a- mai area, west o f P aihia. In dispatches to the Colonial Office tha t later became public , G rey questioned the validity of Henry's titl e to the land and falsely c l aimed that the landholdings of the CMS m issionaries were a cause of th e w ar in the north. Henry was oblige d to defend his land purchases and, m u ch more important as far as h e was concerned, hispersonal integrity ag a inst the governor's charge s. But he was fighting a losing battle again s t a more powerful adver sary. Henry's superior, Bishop G. A. Selwyn, si d ed with Grey, and i n 1849 the CMS in London, persuaded by Henry Willia m s's critics, dec ided that Henry was too much of an embarrassment to re m ain a membe r of the organisation.
His dismissal from the CMS that he had served for so long was a bitte r b l ow to Henry. Within a week of receiving the news in May 1850 h e left P a ihia and moved to Pakaraka, where his children were farmin g the land t h at was the source of so much trouble. He was still a pr iest in the Chu r ch of England and Selwyn had made him archdeacon o f Waimate in1844; he c o ntinued to minister and preach to the Maori i n his locality and gather e d a considerable congregation around him . The injustice against him wa s o nly partly assuaged when he was rei nstated to the CMSin 1854.
Henry Williams's abiding concern for the Maori was apparent in his dis t r ess at the outbreak of warfare with the Pakeha again in 1860. In p riva t e correspondence he was critical of the government officials an d their p o licies, but he remained largely aloof from the public deba te about the w a r. In 1862 he wrote to his brother-in-law, Edward Mar sh: 'I feel our w o rk is drawing to a close; and were it not for th e Maories,I should hav e r elinquished all long since. But I feel boun d to them'.After several y e ars of deteriorating health, Henry Willia ms died on 16 July 1867. His p a ssing was perhaps most keenly felt b y the northernMaori among whom he h a d lived for most of his life. 
WILLIAMS, Henry (I122)
 
8 According to family information William Williams was born at Plumtre H o u se, Nottingham, England, on 18 July 1800, the ninth and youngest c hild o f M ary Marsh and her husband, Thomas Williams. He was baptise d on 30 Oc to ber 1800. Thomas Williams was of Welsh descent, a hosie r by trade and a m a n of substance in Nottingham. He was a Dissenter , but never accepted t h e Unitarian doctrine so strongly propounded i n Nottingham's chapels du r ing the eighteenth and early nineteenth ce nturies. He died of typhoid w h en William was three. After an unsucce ssful attempt to carry on the ho s iery business Mary Williams moved w ith her younger children to Southwe l l, Nottinghamshire, where she be gan a school for young ladies.
In 1813 the marriage of William's sister, Lydia, to their cousin Edwar d G a rrard Marsh brought the family under the influence of this evang elical c l ergyman. Marsh interested Henry, one of William's older bro thers, in t h e work of the Church Missionary Society, which in turn a ffected Willia m . Another consequence was that members of the William s family turned f r om nonconformity to the Church of England. This di ssenting, evangelica l b ackground considerably influenced the two mis sionary brothers and wa s s hared by their wives, making them opponent s of all later high church p r actices within the Anglican church.
William Williams was educated at a small dame school and at Southwel l G r ammar School. He completed an apprenticeship to a Southwell surg eon be f ore entering Magdalen Hall (later Hertford College), Oxford , in 1822, a s a p rospective CMS trainee, under the special care of i ts evangelical p rin cipal, Dr John Macbride. He came down from Oxfor d in 1824 with a BA i n C lassics, and the same year was ordained deac on, on 26 September, and p r iest, on 19 December. At the beginning o f 1825 he was at the CMS Train i ng College, Islington, London.
From the outset of his missionary training there had been a tacit agre e m ent with the CMS that he should follow his brother, Henry, to Ne w Zeal a nd. During a fund raising tour of the Midlands news of his im minent de p arture reached William and hurried along marriage plans. A t Sheffield, o n 1 1 July 1825, he married Jane Nelson of Newark, Nott inghamshire, and o n 1 2 August they embarked on the Sir George Osborn e. After a three mont h s tay at Sydney they landed at Paihia, Bay o f Islands, on 25 March 182 6. B etween 1826 and 1846 they had nine chi ldren, all born in New Zealan d.
At Paihia William Williams was in charge of the English boys' school a n d , until the arrival of Samuel Ford in 1837, was the mission doctor . Hi s e arly fluency in spoken Maori was noted by Henry Williams: 'He Éappear s n ot to learn it; but it seems to flow naturally from him' . In Septemb er 1 826 he began the first serious, sustained effort t o produce the Scr ipt ures in Maori. By the end of 1837 he had complet ed the whole of the N e w Testament and the greater part of the Book o f Common Prayer
In May 1835 the English boys' school was relocated at Waimate North, w h i ch became William's second station. He had already made several mi ssio n ary journeys, some of them most important. In December 1833 an d Januar y 1 834 he had gone by schooner to the East Cape and Mahia pe ninsula, ac co mpanied by William Yate, to return Ngati Porou Maori ca ptured by raid i ng Nga Puhi. (These people were to become the forerun ners of the CMS E a st Coast mission.) Between July and November 183 4 he had travelled ove r land to the Thames and Waikato regions, accom panied by Alfred Nesbit B r own. In January 1838, with William Colenso , Richard Matthews and James S t ack, he made an overland journey fro m East Cape to Turanga, Poverty Ba y . He was determined that a CMS mi ssionary be stationed on the East Coa s t, and 'when Richard Taylor, w ho had travelled with him on another vis i t there from March to May 1 839, agreed to take over the Waimate school , h e and Jane left for Tu ranga on 31 December 1839.
Apart from a visit to England during 1851--52 to vindicate the New Zea l a nd mission and his brother, William Williams remained based at th e Tur a nga mission station from 20 January 1840 to 3 April 1865. Fo r many yea r s he was the only ordained CMS missionary in the church' s eastern dist r ict, walking north to East Cape, south to Hawke's Ba y and inland to Wa i karemoana as part of a regular visiting schedule . He made occasional o v erland journeys to Wellington and to St John' s College, Auckland. Selw y n inducted him as archdeacon of the East C ape on 27 November 1842, and o n 3 A pril 1859 consecrated him bisho p of Waiapu, a diocese which initia lly h ad a predominantly Maori cha racter. (On his English visit a doctor ate o f canon law from Oxford h ad been conferred on him.)
In April 1857, having come to realise that the training of a Maori pas t o rate was his main job, William Williams moved from the first missi on s i te at Manutuke (at Kaupapa between 1840 and 1844, and then at W hakato) , t o locate his Maori training schools and his residence at W aerenga-a- hi ka, a few miles inland, where there was more land availa ble for a mis s ion farm. After leaving Turanga in 1865 he stayed fo r two years at Pai h ia where he began another training school at Horo tutu. There he wrote C h ristianity among the New Zealanders , publish ed in London in 1867 and i n tended as an apologia for the CMS missio n in New Zealand. At the end o f M ay 1867 he moved to Napier and th e following year into his final res id ence, Hukarere, on Napier hill . An agreement between Bishops G. A. Se l wyn and C. J. Abraham had ad ded Hawke's Bay to the Waiapu diocese, and W i lliam was anxious to ma ke Te Aute estate (set aside for educational pu r poses by his nephe w and son-in-law, Samuel Williams) the site of his c e ntral diocesa n school. In July 1875 he also established the Hukarere s c hool for M aori girls, close by his own home. His daughter, Anna Maria, w a s pri ncipal. On 9 February 1878 he died at Hukarere. His land at Napi e r w as worth nearly £9,000, and he left other property at Kerikeri , Taur an ga and Gisborne.
William Williams once described his missionary life as 'like the unbro k e n course of a parish schoolmaster. A great deal of work, but mos t of i t o f the same character'. With his Maori converts he regularl y 'read an d c onversed', but apart from his knowledge of the languag e he showed li tt le interest in Maori culture and disapproved of mos t Maori social cus t oms. Nevertheless his influence among his missio n Maori, to whom he wa s k nown as Parata (Brother), was considerable . He generally found that ' a l ittle quiet expostulation' settled dif ferences between Maori and mis si onary. His colleagues found him kind ly, easy to get along with and 'a g e ntleman', but when his principle s were crossed, either by Bishop Selwy n o r by the CMS secretaries i n London, he was adamant and resolute. His d e cision to quit Waerenga -a-hika in 1865, when it was threatened by a sm a ll band of Hauhau wh o fraternised with his Turanga Maori, appears to h a ve been influence d not so much by the admonishments of Selwyn and memb e rs of his fami ly, as by William's own determination to withdraw his pr e sence and h is mana from those who were prepared to entertain 'false go d s'.
His attitude to colonisation and to the New Zealand wars changed as h e g r ew older. In 1840 he collected signatures to the Treaty of Waita ngi, a n d later defended its land guarantee against threats by settle rs and Br i tish authorities. He was critical of the Waitara purchase , but thought t h at the wisest course was for the government to subju gate 'rebel' Maori ; ' salutary chastisement' would bring them to thei r senses. Later he re vi sed that opinion: 'All this war down to the p resent time [1868] has s p rung out of WaitaraÉ. As a community and a s a government we have been p u ffed up, first with an idea that we we re in the right, & secondly that w e w ere able to put down the native s by our own strengthÉ. We are now br ou ght very low.' Land confiscat ion, he came to think, was particularly u n just. For years he had reg arded Turanga as a missionary enclave; retur n ing there from Englan d in 1853 he disapproved of the attempt made by h i s locum, T. S. Gra ce, to introduce European trading practices.
As a steady, conscientious teacher William Williams was neither too up l i fted by the apparent missionary success of the 1830s and 1840s, no r to o d ismayed by the massive falling away of the 1850s and 1860s. A ll thro ug h his missionary life he kept revising the Maori New Testam ent and Bo o k of Common Prayer. In 1844 he was with the 'Translatio n Syndicate' at W a imate, but mostly he worked alone, conferring fro m time to time with R o bert Maunsell. His enduring memorial is A dict ionary of the New Zealan d l anguage , first published at Paihia in 18 44. The second edition was a l so his work, the third and fourth tha t of his son, Bishop William Leon a rd Williams, and the fifth, of hi s grandson, Bishop Herbert William Wi l liams.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

According to family information William Williams was born at Plumtre H o u se, Nottingham, England, on 18 July 1800, the ninth and youngest c hild o f M ary Marsh and her husband, Thomas Williams. He was baptise d on30 Oct ob er 1800. Thomas Williams was of Welsh descent, a hosie r by trade and a m a n of substance in Nottingham. He was a Dissenter , but never accepted t h e Unitarian doctrine so strongly propounded i n Nottingham's chapels du r ing the eighteenth and early nineteenth ce nturies. He died of typhoid w h en William was three. After an unsucce ssful attempt to carry on the ho s iery business Mary Williams moved w ith her younger children to Southwe l l, Nottinghamshire, where she be gan a school for young ladies.
In 1813 the marriage of William's sister, Lydia, to their cousin Edwar d G a rrard Marsh brought the family under the influence of this evang elical c l ergyman. Marsh interested Henry, one of William's older bro thers, in t h e work of the Church Missionary Society, which in turn a ffected Willia m . Another consequence was that members of the William s family turned f r om nonconformity to the Church of England. This di ssenting, evangelica l b ackground considerably influenced the two mis sionary brothers and wa s s hared by their wives, making them opponent s of all later high church p r actices within the Anglican church.
William Williams was educated at a small dame school and at SouthwellG r a mmar School. He completed an apprenticeship to a Southwell surgeon befo r e entering Magdalen Hall (later Hertford College), Oxford, in 1 822, as a p r ospective CMS trainee, under the special care of its eva ngelical princ i pal, Dr John Macbride. He came down from Oxford in 18 24 with a BA in C l assics, and the same year was ordained deacon, o n 26 September, and pr i est, on 19 December. At the beginning of 182 5 he was at the CMS Traini n g College, Islington, London.
From the outset of his missionary training there had been a tacit agre e m ent with the CMS that he should follow his brother, Henry, to Ne w Zeal a nd. During a fund raising tour of the Midlands news of his im minent de p arture reached William and hurried along marriage plans. A t Sheffield, o n 1 1 July 1825, he married Jane Nelson of Newark, Nott inghamshire, and o n 1 2 August they embarked on the Sir George Osborn e. After athree month s t ay at Sydney they landed at Paihia, Bay of I slands, on 25 March 1826. B e tween 1826 and 1846 they had nine childr en, all born in New Zealand.
At Paihia William Williams was in charge of the English boys' school a n d , until the arrival of Samuel Ford in 1837, was the mission doctor .His e a rly fluency in spoken Maori was noted by Henry Williams: 'HeÉ appears n o t to learn it; but it seems to flow naturally from him'. I n September 1 8 26 he began the first serious, sustained effort to pro duce the Scriptu r es in Maori. By the end of 1837 he had completed th e whole of the New T e stament and the greater part of the Book of Com mon Prayer
In May 1835 the English boys' school was relocated at Waimate North, w h i ch became William's second station. He had already made several mi ssio n ary journeys, some of them most important. In December 1833 an d Januar y 1 834 he had gone by schooner to the East Cape and Mahia pe ninsula, ac co mpanied by William Yate, to return Ngati Porou Maori ca ptured by raid i ng Nga Puhi. (These people were to become the forerun ners of the CMS E a st Coast mission.) Between July and November 183 4 he had travelled ove r land to the Thames and Waikato regions, accom panied by Alfred Nesbit B r own. In January 1838, with William Colenso , Richard Matthews and James S t ack, he made an overland journey fro m East Cape to Turanga, Poverty Ba y . He was determined that a CMS mi ssionary be stationedon the East Coas t , and 'when Richard Taylor, wh o had travelled with him on another visi t t here from March to May 18 39, agreed to take over the Waimate school, h e a nd Jane left for Tur anga on 31 December 1839.
Apart from a visit to England during 1851--52 to vindicate the New Zea l a nd mission and his brother, William Williams remained based at th e Tur a nga mission station from 20 January 1840 to 3 April 1865. Fo r manyyear s h e was the only ordained CMS missionary in the church' s easterndistri ct , walking north to East Cape, south to Hawke's Ba y and inlandto Waika r emoana as part of a regular visiting schedule . He made occasional over l and journeys to Wellington and to St John' s College, Auckland. Selwyn i n ducted him as archdeacon of the East C ape on 27 November 1842, and on 3 A p ril 1859 consecrated him bisho p of Waiapu, a diocese which initially h a d a predominantly Maori cha racter. (On his English visit a doctorate o f c anon law from Oxford h ad been conferred on him.)
In April 1857, having come to realise that the training of a Maori pas t o rate was his main job, William Williams moved from the first missi on s i te at Manutuke (at Kaupapa between 1840 and 1844, and then at W hakato) , t o locate his Maori training schools and his residence at W aerenga-a- hi ka, a few miles inland, where there was more land availa ble for a mis s ion farm. After leaving Turanga in 1865 he stayed fo r two years at Pai h ia where he began another training school at Horo tutu. Therehe wrote C h ristianity among the New Zealanders , publishe d in London in 1867 and i n tended as an apologia for the CMS missio n in New Zealand. At the end o f M ay 1867 he moved to Napier and th e following year into his final res id ence, Hukarere, on Napier hill . An agreement betweenBishops G. A. Sel w yn and C. J. Abraham had add ed Hawke's Bay to the Waiapu diocese, and W i lliam was anxious to mak e Te Aute estate (set aside for educational pu r poses by his nephew a nd son-in-law, Samuel Williams) the site of his c e ntral diocesan sch ool. In July 1875 he also established the Hukarere s c hool for Maor i girls, close by his own home. His daughter, Anna Maria, w a s princi pal. On 9 February 1878 he died at Hukarere. His land at Napie r w a s worth nearly £9,000, and he left other property at Kerikeri, Taur a n ga and Gisborne.
William Williams once described his missionary life as 'like the unbro k e n course of a parish schoolmaster. A great deal of work, but mos t of i t o f the same character'. With his Maori converts he regularl y 'read an d c onversed', but apart from his knowledge of the languag e he showed li tt le interest in Maori culture and disapproved of mos t Maori social cus t oms. Nevertheless his influence among his missio n Maori, to whom he wa s k nown as Parata (Brother), was considerable . He generally found that ' a l ittle quiet expostulation' settled dif ferences between Maori and mis si onary. His colleagues found him kind ly, easy to get alongwith and 'a g e ntleman', but when his principle s were crossed, either by Bishop Selwy n o r by the CMS secretaries i n London, he was adamant and resolute. His d e cision to quit Waerenga -a-hika in 1865, when it wasthreatened by a sma l l band of Hauhau wh o fraternised with his TurangaMaori, appears to hav e b een influence d not so much by the admonishments of Selwyn and member s o f his fami ly, as by William's own determination to withdraw his pres en ce and h is mana from those who were preparedto entertain 'false gods' .
His attitude to colonisation and to the New Zealand wars changed as h e g r ew older. In 1840 he collected signatures to the Treaty of Waita ngi, a n d later defended its land guarantee against threats by settle rs and Br i tish authorities. He was critical of the Waitara purchase , but thought t h at the wisest course was for the government to subju gate 'rebel' Maori ; ' salutary chastisement' would bring them to thei r senses. Later he re vi sed that opinion: 'All this war down to the p resent time [1868] has s p rung out of WaitaraÉ. As a community and a s a government we have been p u ffed up, first with an idea that we we re in the right,& secondly that w e w ere able to put down the native s by our own strengthÉ. We are now br ou ght very low.' Land confiscat ion, he came to think, was particularly u n just. For years he had reg arded Turanga as a missionary enclave; retur n ing there from Englan d in 1853 he disapproved of the attempt made by h i s locum, T. S. Gra ce, to introduce European trading practices.
As a steady, conscientious teacher William Williams was neither too up l i fted by the apparent missionary success of the 1830s and 1840s, no rtoo d i smayed by the massive falling away of the 1850s and 1860s. Al l through h i s missionary life he kept revising the Maori New Testame nt and Book of C o mmon Prayer. In 1844 he was with the 'Translation S yndicate' at Waimat e , but mostly he worked alone, conferring from ti me to time with Robert M a unsell. His enduring memorial is A dictiona ry of the New Zealand langu a ge , first published at Paihia in 1844 . The second edition was also hi s w ork, the third and fourth that o f his son, BishopWilliam Leonard Wil li ams, and the fifth, of his gra ndson, Bishop Herbert William Williams.
BIRT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/ 
WILLIAMS, William (I27)
 
9 Address: home DUNN, Thomas (I184)
 
10 Address: MetlifeCare Village
Address: MetlifeCare Village 
AUSTIN, Carroll Dorothy (I14)
 
11 Address: Mornington Parish Dunedin Family F2
 
12 Address: Office of the Registrar of Marriages Family F27
 
13 Address: Resisdence of John H Harrison, Majoribanks St Family F67
 
14 AFN: NOTE

OTAGO COLONIST SEPTEMBER 28 1860

Otago Witnes s S eptember 2
CONC 9 1860

Shipping Intelligence: September 24 - Henrie t ta, Cu
CONC mming, from Glasgow, M ay 30 1860

[Otago Witness 4 Augu s t 1860
CONC , Page 4]

Passengers - Paying their o w n pass
CONC ages :

Andrew John

[Begg Samuel]

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CONC

Black Archibald

Bremner John

Came r on Du
CONC ncan, wife, 2 sons & 2 daughters

Dickson William

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Dugard Robert (Duguid)

Eadie William wife , 1 s on, 2 d
CONC aughters

Erskine James

Falconer Janet < /p> CONC >

Farmer James B.

Ferguson William

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CONC am George

Grant Elspeth

Greig Davi d & w ife
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Greig Janet

Hamilton Mrs. David

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Litster Jame s

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McColl Duncan

McGill William

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McLellan Catherine

McNeil He c tor, w
CONC ife & daughter

Mill Robert

Mill Will i am and w
CONC ife Catherine

Munro Donald

Oliver El i zabeth
CONC

Reid Simon

Robertson Jas.

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Smeaton James

[Whit e John]
CONC

Assisted emigrants:

CONC >

Ballantine (?Ballantyne) Francis & Wife, 4 sons, 5 daughters < /p> CONC >

Cairns Peter & Wife, 1 son

Cameron Ewe n & W ife, 7 s
CONC ons, 3 daughters (Allan, Duncan & Ewen)

Cameron J o hn and w
CONC ife & Margaret (Angus Cameron paid £3 passage m oney to the Prov i ncial G
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[Crichton William]

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Clark Ann

Couper (?Cowper) Ann

C r ichton
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Dallas Thomas & and wife Elizabeth

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D eans J
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Duncan Peter


CONC Duncan William

Ferguson James

Gordo n Joh
CONC n

Grant James & Wife (Elspet)

Gray W alter w
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Greig Janet (paid £1 4 p assage m
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Hardie James, & Wife, 2 sons, 4 dau g hters<
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Henderson John & Wife, 2 sons, 1 daughter (Alexand e r Hend
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CONC pril 16 1 863)

Hislop Mungo & Wife, 1 son

< p >Hunte
CONC r Archibald & Wife, 1 son

Kinloch Margaret

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CONC p>Livingston Charles & Wife, 3 sons, 4 daughters

M a ckay A
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McColl Duncan & Wife, 4 sons, 4 daughters

CONC >

McEwen Jessie

McKenzie John & Wife and 2 son s

CONC p>

McLaren John ?gardener (Dundee)

McLaren J ohn & W
CONC ife, 2 sons

McLeod Alexander & Wife, 1 son, 2 dau g hters<
CONC /p>

McPherson Angus & Wife

Marshall Jame s & W if
CONC e, 2 sons

Mathieson Alexander

Morriso n Malc
CONC olm & Wife, 5 sons

Murdoch Peter

Oli v er J
CONC ohn wife and 5 sons (James Oliver paid £10 passage money t o th e P rovin
CONC cial Government of Otago on May 26 1869)

Orr John & W i fe, 6 (
CONC ?5)sons, 3 daughters

Robertson Robert & Wife, 6 da u ghters
CONC

Robertson John

Rogers George & Wif e

CONC p>

Sinclair Robert & Helen, James, John, Arthur

< p>Sinc
CONC lair Robert & Wife

Smith George

Ste e dman J
CONC ames & Wife, 2 sons, 1 daughter

Steven James

< / p>

<
CONC p>Sutherland John (?Lybster)

Sutherland Benjamin< / p>


CONC

Sutherland John & Wife, 1 son, 1 daughter

Sw a n Ag
CONC nes

Webster Robert

Young Willia m & W ife, 3 s
CONC ons (James)

The above list include s 4 f ar
CONC mers

26 ploughmen

17 shepherds

< p>

3 m
CONC asons

9 quarrymen

3 blacksmiths 4 c a rpente
CONC rs

1 tailor

1 teacher

4 g a rdener
CONC s

14 labourers

20 female servants.

< /p>


CONC

From the "Otago Witness"

"THE HENR I ETTA" T
CONC he barque "Henrietta" arrived at the Heads on Mo nday morning, a f ter a p
CONC assage of 115 days from Glasgow. The rather prot racted voyage i s r efer
CONC able to bad weather since passing the meridian of t he Cape, pre v ious t
CONC o which not a reef had been taken in the topsails. S he had on b o ard, a
CONC t starting 238 souls, equal to 194½ statute adults, a n umber w h ich ha
CONC s been somewhat reduced by the casualties noted below. We r egre t t o le
CONC arn that sickness has prevailed, and is still prevalent amon g t h e pass
CONC engers to a considerable extent, though there have been no in fe c tions o
CONC r contagious diseases. Various reports are in circulation a s t o t he ca
CONC use of illness, it having been alleged by some that the accomm o d ation o
CONC n board was insufficient, by others that the passengers have n o t r ecei
CONC ved the necessary medical attention: and certainly the disgrace f u l fac
CONC t that the surgeon was locked up on a charge of drunkenness a fe w h o ur
CONC s after landing, does not say much for his fitness for his onero u s d ut
CONC ies. The captain states, however, that the passengers were far f r om g e
CONC nerally healthy when they embarked, and their appearance on boar d ing w a
CONC s certainly not such as could have been wished, or equal to tha t o f pr e
CONC vious arrivals. One female died on board the "Oberon" on the pas s age u p t
CONC he harbour. We presume that some inquiry will take place, and th e ref or
CONC e refrain from further comment.

The following births an d d eath
CONC s have occurred:

BIRTHS

J uly 17
CONC Mrs. J Deans of a son premature (died in 24 hours)

< p>July 2
CONC 0 Mrs. R Sinclair a son

July 17 Mrs. Hamilton a d aught
CONC er

DEATHS

July 18 Mar y D eans a
CONC ged 2 yrs Decline

July 19 R Robertson aged 40 A p oplexy
CONC

August 6 John Sutherland aged 23 months Decline< / p>


CONC

August 30 Robert Orr aged 2 yrs Marasmus

Se p t 5 J
CONC ohn Cameron aged 15 yrs Brain fever

Sept 7 Hanna h O live
CONC r aged 19 yrs Brain Fever

Sept 13 Catherine Came r on age
CONC d 20 yrs Brain Fever

Sept 17 Catherine Cameron ag e d 19 y
CONC rs Brain Fever

Sept 22 Grace Cameron aged 23 yrs B rain F
CONC ever

Sept 26 Mrs. Ballantine aged 26 yrs Decline < /p> CONC >

The following address was given signed by 7 0 p asse
CONC ngers:

"Dear Sir,-

Now that we have la n ded in o
CONC ur adopted land we feel it to be our duty t o express our high a p precia
CONC tion of your qualities as a commander and yo ur conduct as a gen t leman. W
CONC e likewise desire to testify our appreciati on of the conduct o f M r.Fin
CONC nie Chief Officer and Mr.Turner second Offic er and also of th e c rew wh
CONC o have done everything in their power to add t o our comfort b y m any ac
CONC ts of kindness during the voyage With every wis h that prosperit y m ay a
CONC ttend to you to the termination of your career w e remain yours , & c." CONC p>

Information courtesy of Alison de Caen wh o i s res
CONC earching the Hamilton a nd Litster families. Posted 3 January 20 0 0.


CONC

Otago Witness, 6 October 1860, Page 5

The f
CONC ollowing; letter, accompanied by a gold chain was presented to C a p tain G
CONC umming of the Henrietta by a number of the passengers : — We , t h e unde
CONC rsigned passengers by the barque Henrietta, from Glasgow to O ta g o, wis
CONC h to express our gratitude and esteem of Captain Gumming a s a c o mmande
CONC r and gentleman, and also his uniform kindness and attention t o p r omot
CONC e our comfort during the voyage, by presenting him with a gold c h a in, w
CONC ishing that all success may attend him to the end of his career. 

BILLING, Reginald (I566)
 
15 Before the Plantation of Ulster, the area of Crawfordsburn was known a s B allymullan (Irish: Baile Ui Mhaoláin). Crawfordsburn originated i n the 1 7th century as a small settlement on an important routeway alo ng North D own. It was named after a stream which flows through the vi llage. It ha s retained elements of its 17th-century history along it s Main Street i ncluding the coaching inn. The Sharman-Crawford famil y developed the vi llage in the 18th and 19th centuries. Crawfordsbur n was promoted as a V ictorian tourist attraction, particularly for th ose visitors using the r ailway to nearby Helens Bay.
Source: Wikipedia 
LOWRY, Susan (I260)
 
16 BIRT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/
DEAT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/ 
ISGAR, Lydia (I129)
 
17 BIRT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/ 
DALE, Dorothea (I201)
 
18 BIRT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/ 
NELSON, George (I716)
 
19 Christopher came to New Zealand with his family in 1860 on the SS 'Ro b R o y'. He was . educated at St John's College, Auckland, then joine d the I n spector's Office of the Bank of New Zealand in Auckland in 1 871. He wa s s ubsequently Accountant for the Bank at Napier and the n successively a g ent and relieving officer at Russell, Wairoa, Kaiko ura South, Rakaia, F o xton, Waipawa and Gore. He was appointed Manage r of the Palmerston Nor t h branch in July 1895 and whilst there he an d Ellen were both active m e mbers of All Saints' Church. Christophe r was a member of the vestry an d t he choir and secretary of the loca l St Barnabas Association while El le n was described as being 'greatl y to the fore in all benevolent works ' . When they left Christopher w as presented by the choir and officers w i th a handsome pair of carve rs as a token of esteem and affection . His f i nal posting was as Man ager of the Bank at Napier, from which he retire d i n 1907.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Christopher came to New Zealand with his family in 1860 on the SS 'Ro b R o y'. He was . educated at St John's College, Auckland, then joine dthe I n spector's Office of the Bank of New Zealand in Auckland in 18 71. He wa s s ubsequently Accountant for the Bank at Napier and then s uccessively a g ent and relieving officer at Russell, Wairoa, Kaikour a South, Rakaia, F o xton, Waipawa and Gore. He was appointed Manage r of the Palmerston Nor t h branch in July 1895 and whilst there he an d Ellen wereboth active me m bers of All Saints' Church. Christopher w as a member of the vestry and t h e choir and secretary of the local S t Barnabas Association while Ellen w a s described as being 'greatly t o the fore in all benevolent works'. Wh e n they left Christopher wa s presented by the choir and officers with a h a ndsome pair of carver s as a token of esteem and affection . His final p o sting was as Mana ger of the Bank at Napier, from which he retired in 1 9 07.
TEXT: _WEBTAG
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URL http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=websearch-4181&h=40 7 9821&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt 
MACLEAN, Christopher Haydon (I49)
 
20 DEAT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.williams.gen.nz/ 
MARSH, Mary (I124)
 
21 Educated at Wanganui Collegiate School. Farmed Harekeke, 500 Coastal p r o perty near Wanganui BLYTH, Harrison David (I7)
 
22 Emigrated to America in 1847.
Obituary: " Died. On the last day of March, 1873, in the town of Winn e conne, Mrs. Maria Lean. Her life reached beyond the allotted three s cor e years and ten. She was born in the year 1800 in County Cornwall , Eng. , Parish of Blisland. In the year 1847 she came to this countr y with h er husband who survives her at a ripe old age. On coming to t he United S tates they settled in Jefferson Co. Wis., where they live d until about e ight years ago when they removed to Ball Prairie. Ther e her life was pa ssed in peace and quietness, surrounded by sons an d daughters to admini ster to her. A numerous family of two sons an d seven daughters still l ive to cherish the memory of their mother. B aptized in infancy, and con firmed at a suitable age as a member of th e Church of England, her exem plary life testified to the last, her tr ust in that form of saving fait h." 
LEAN, Maria (I950)
 
23 From the Griffith Evalutions of Ireland it would appear that James Aus t in and James Shanks lived in the samlearea, right next door to eac h oth er SHANKS, James (I307)
 
24 From: Christine Clement
Subject: Moore HUNTER
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2005 20:55:07 +1200

Moore HUNTER was born in Scotland and died Hawera 3 February 1897 aged
62years i.e.born c. 1835.
His father was Alexander and mother Margaret? He married Mary Murray.
Don't know about connection to this Robert Gibson Hunter?

Christine Clement
Te Puke (Kiwifruit Capital of the World)
New Zealand
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sooty
cmclement@clear.net.nz
List Manager for Ballinger-UK, Boulcott, Shand, and Audas on Rootsweb. c om

Death of Mr. Moore Hunter.
Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 3462, 3 February 1897, Pag e 2
Death of Mr. Moore Hunter.

We regret having to record the death of Mr Moore Hunter, which occurre d a t his residence this morning about halfpast six. It is pretty gene rally k nown Mr Hunter had been in more or less feeble health for som e time pas t, an attack of pleurisy having resulted in a complicatio n of diseases f rom which latterly it was hardly hoped he would rally . Indeed, during t he past few days his hold on life was most precario us, though friends w ho knew little of his real condition, but relie d on the wonderful recup eratve power he had from time to time shown , hoped that he might be aga in seen about. However, the end came, a s stated this morning. Mr Hunter w as a colonist of very old standing . He was born in the village of Braid wood, Lanarkshire, but at an ear ly age the sturdy independence which he s howed in later years began t o develope, and he emigrated to Canada, and a fter a visit to Scotlan d again went out, but in time the more genial cl imate of New Zealan d attracted him. The oldest settlers on the coast re member him at Ka i Iwi, where in the days of native troubles he had to b ear his part w ith his fellow settlers, and we believe, though we are no t quite cert ain, that he was a member of the Kai Iwi troop, wich which t he Hon. J ohn Bryce was assooiatad. Later on Mr Hunter had a farm at Wai totar a now occupied by Mr William Parsons, which he sold and came on to H a wera. This must have been early in the seventies, and just at that ti m e Hawera was being re-settled after Titokowaru's war. The land abou t he re had been divided up into small sections and military settler s were e ncouraged to settle, privates getting 50 acre scrip and offic ers larger . But a large slice of land running to the southward and we stward of th e present town site had been marked off as a railway rese rve, and this t he Government determined to sell. Mr Hunter, among oth ers, was a purcha ser at the sale, acquiring sections which formed th e nucleus of the pre sent fine estate of Burnside, whereon he made hi s home, reared his fami ly, and has now died. It was like the other un occupied land, fern and t utu, and in a rough state, and its present c ondition, in which it is pe rhaps one of the best cultivated, clean, a nd most productive farms on t he coast is a tribute to the energy an d hard work and persevarance of t his pioneer settler. During his lon g residence in the district Mr Hunte r built up a reputation as a care ful, good farmer, liberal in his ideas o f how to treat land and bree d stock the success of which policy has bee n often shown in the sho w rings of the Egmont, Wanganui, Palmerston Nor th, and other agricult ural and pastoral societies. For many years fello w settlers were gla d to get the benefit of his business shrewdness and e xperience on loc al bodies, and he was successively a member of the Pate a County Counc il, Hawera Road Board, and Hawera County Council ; while a s to the A . and P. Society he wss not only in evidence at show time, bu t a valu ed officer from the inception of this institution. All movement s whic h he considered for the solid advantage and prosperity of the dis tric t be was a supporter of, and was ready to help both with purse and w o rk. Of the Presbyterian Church he was a consistent member and a grea t h elper ; none knew his worth and his liberality better, perhaps, th an th ose associated with him in that Communion ; and all bodies whic h sought t o promote the social and moral well-being of the people wer e ever sure o f help from him. Privately, there was no man whom one wo uld be less dis posed to approach had he a weak case ; or more ready , if he had a case r eally deserving of help. Mr Hunter had the powe r and courage of discrim ination; qualities much rarer than they shoul d be for the well being of t he community. As to colonial politics, h e never sought any public offic e, but his interest was keen and his f eelings strong. Mr Hunter leaves a w idow and family of eight (and sev eral brothers and other relatives) to m ourn him, and the district, wh ich in a wide sense is a loser by his dea th, will sympathise with the m in their loss.

Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 3462, 3 February 1897, Pag e 2

The Late Mr Moore Hunter.

MEMORIAL SERVICE. A funeral service in connection with the death of th e l ate Mr Moore Hunter was conducted on Sunday morning at the Presbyt erian C hurch by the Rev. T. McDonald. The pulpit wis draped in black , and hymn s appropriate to the occasion were sung. Mr McDonald chos e for his text t he words " And I heard a voice from Heaven saying unt o me, Write, Bless ed are the dead which die in the Lord from hencefor th : Yea, saith the S pirit, that they may rest from their labours ; a nd their works do follo w them."- Revelation XIV- IB. The address thro ughout was solemn and imp ressive, and listened to with great interes t by the large congregation p resent. Referring particularly to the lo ss the church had sustained by t he demise of their late friend and br other he said they knew he had bee n long interested in this charg e - in fact since its beginning he had b een foremost in every good wo rd and work; they had almost come to think t hat his wise counsel an d generous help were indispensible to the carryi ng on of the work. I n every department of it his loss would be most kee nly felt. Unti l a few months ago he had conducted a class in the Sabbat h School an d he always manifested the deepest interest in all that pert ained t o the moral and spiritual well-being of the young. When any effo rt wa s made on be half of their church, on behalf of Foreign Missions o r i ndeed on behalf of any needy object he was always to the front. The r e were many beautiful traits in his life. There was a spontaneity ab out h is Christian services that they should long remember and long va lue. He a lso carried out, as the speaker had seen few do, the words o f the Lord J esus Christ, " Let not thy left hand know what thy righ t hand doeth." O stentation and parade were unknown to him. After spea king of deceased's r eligious life, Mr McDonald said the loss create d by his death to his wi fe and family was an irreparable one, and th e loss to their church was g reat ; the loss also to many whom he befr iended in times of difficulty w as great. Mr McDonald added that perso nally he had lost a wise counsell or and a true friend - one whose wor ds were valuable to him when cast d own by reason of the hardness of t he world. But while they recognised h is loss as irreparable they ha d another and a brighter side to the pict ure, for to him to die wa s a glorious gain and a deliverance from tbe g roanings of earth to th e songs of Heaven ; from great bodily weakness t o the strength that c haracterises those who have entered the Celestial C ity. What a change ; what a blessed change! They should miss him sadly, a nd he appeale d to members of the congregation to fill the breach in chu rch work hi s death had occasioned. Of him he thought it might truly be s aid, "H e hath done what he could." Mr McDonald concluded by imploring G od' s comfort and hope to the bereaved widow and family.

Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XXXIV, Issue 3466, 8 February 1897, Pag e 2

COUNTY CHAIRMEN.

HAWERA.

The annual meeting of the Hawera County Council was held yesterday, fo r t he election of a Chairman for the year. There were present -Messr s Moor e Hunter (chairman), A. C. Milne, Finlayeon, and Partridge. Mr . Milne p roposed that Mr. Hunter be re-elected Chairman, and remarke d that Mr. H unter lived near town, which was a great convenience, bu t apart from th at he had conducted the affairs of the County admirabl y, and a better m an could not be obtained. Mr. Hunter desired to be.r elieved of office, a nd suggested the election of Councillor Yorke. Mr . Partridge also eulog ised Mr. Hunter, and, after persuasion, Mr. Hun ter was induced to accep t office again, and was then duly elected. I t was resolved to hold a sp ecial meeting on Thursday, 6th December, i n place of the ordinary meeti ng on the Ist inst.

Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume IV, Issue 662, 29 November 1883, Page 2
DEAT: _PROOF proven 
HUNTER, Moore (I207)
 
25 http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dunn-2040
TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlists/josephfletcher.ht m l 
DUNN, Alice Stewart (I18)
 
26 In 1161, the MacLean tribe transplanted from the province of Moray i n S cotland. The head of the clan was Gillean of the Battle of Ax. G illia n lived during the reign of Alexander IIIL. Gillean had a son n amed Gi lliemore; who in turn had a son named John. John had two sons ; Lachlan L ubanach MacLean, the proprietor of Duart and Hector Regena ch MacLean th e proprietor of Lochberg. Initially the MacLean brother s were follower s of the Lord of Lorn, but after a disagreement they s witched loyalties a nd followed the Lord of Isles. Due to distinctio n in the service for t his Lord, they were given large tracts of lan d on the Island of Mull. I n 1366 Lachlan married the Lord's daughter , while Hector was Lieutenant G eneral of the army of the Lord of Isle s. By 1493 the MacLeans' owned M ull and Teres Islands and parts of J ura, Islay and Scarvia.

By this time the MacLeans were divided into four clans. The stronges t o f the four were the descendents of Lachlan. Caroline M. C. Lean w as a d escendent of the Lachlan branch. This branch was known as th e MacLeans o f Duart. By 1579 the branches of the clan were feuding . The Lachlan M acLean at that time captured the castle of Hector Mac Lean of Coll. Fro m 1579-81 Lachlan was in constant warfare. In a fe ud he killed MacDona ld of Dungoey. He had Hector MacLean beheaded . He also imprisoned Don ald MacLean and had nine other men and two w omen murdered. As a byprod uct of this butchery he was knighted. I n 1594 he fought gallantly in t he battle of Glenlivet. Finally in 15 98 he fought in a dreadful clan w ar and was slain.

By 1600 the branches of the MacLean's at Duart were scattered. Charle s M acLean moved to Drimin Scotland. His son William moved to Milltow n Mil ls and dropped the Mac form the name. 
LEANE, Thomas (I759)
 
27 In about 1810, James Austin was born in Ballygrott, Bangor, County Dow n , Ireland. Family history goes that James Austin´s father met one o f th e Greville sisters when he was a tutor for the Greville family i n Warkw ick Castle, England. She fell in love with him and they elope d and came b ack to Ireland to live. This is not verified though as th ere is no ment ion of a Susan Greville being born at the castle. It ma y be that record s were erased.

BANGOR, a parish and sea-port and market-town and post-town, chiefly i n t he barony of ARDES, county of DOWN, and province of ULSTER, but pa rtly i n the barony of LOWER-CASTLEREAGH, ll.5 miles (N. E. By E.) fro m Belfas t, 21 miles (N.) from Downpatrick, and 9l.5 miles (N. By E. ) from Dubli n; containing 9355 inhabitants, of which number, 2741 ar e in the town.
The origin and early history of this ancient town are involved in som e o bscurity, and have been variously described by different writers . The m ost authentic records concur in stating that, about the year 5 55, St. C omgall founded here an abbey of Regular Canons, which may ha ve led to t he formation of a town, if one did not exist previously, a nd over which h e presided fifty years, and died and was enshrined i n it. In 1125 the A bbey was rebuilt by Malachy O Morgair, then abbot , with the addition of a n oratory of stone, said by St. Bernard to ha ve been the first building o f stone and lime in Ireland and from whic h this place, anciently called t he Vale of Angels, derived the name o f Beanchoir, now Bangor, signifyin g the White Church, or Fair Choir.
The town is advantageously situated on the south side of Belfast Loug h o r Carrickfergus bay, and on the direct sea coast road from Belfas t to D onaghadee; in 1831 it contained 563 houses, most of which are i ndiffere ntly built, and is much frequented for sea-bathing during th e summer. T he streets are neither paved nor lighted, but are kept ver y clean and t he inhabitants are but indifferently supplied with water . There is a pu blic library; and an Historical Society has been recen tly formed in con nection with it. The cotton manufacture is carried o n to a considerable e xtent in the town and neighbourhood, and afford s employment to a great n umber of the inhabitants of both sexes in th e weaving, sewing, and orna mental branches.
The trade of the port is inconsiderable: black cattle, horses, grain , a nd flax are exported: the only imports are coal and timber. The ba y is w ell sheltered, and affords good anchorage in deep water for ves sels det ained by an unfavourable wind and the harbour is capable of g reat impro vement, although attempts made at the expense of individual s have faile d. A small pier was built about the year 1760, by means o f a parliament ary grant of 500 pounds to the corporation for promotin g and carrying o n the inland navigation of Ireland. The neighbourin g bays produce a var iety of fish; oysters of large size are taken i n abundance. The surroun ding scenery is pleasingly diversified, and e nriched in some parts with s tately timber, chiefly fir and oak; and i n the vicinity of the several g entlemen s seats are thriving plantati ons of beech, sycamore, ash and p oplar, of comparatively modern growt h.
Slate is found in several parts, but has been only procured in one qua r ry, which has not been worked sufficiently deep to produce a qualit y ca pable of resisting the action of the atmosphere. There are also m ines o f coal, especially on the estate of Lord Dufferin, whose fathe r opened a nd worked them on a small scale, since which time they hav e been abando ned; and a lead mine was worked here to some extent abou t thirty years s ince, in which copper ore and manganese were also fou nd.
Extracts from The Samuel Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland 183 7 ( transcribed by Mel Lockie) 
AUSTIN, James (I259)
 
28 In about 1810, James Austin was born in Ballygrott, Bangor, County Dow n , Ireland. Family history goes that James Austin´s father met one o f th e Greville sisters when he was a tutor for the Greville family i n Warkw ick Castle, England. She fell in love with him and they elope d and came b ack to Ireland to live. This is not verified though as th ere is no ment ion of a Susan Greville being born at the castle. It ma y be that record s were erased. GREVILLE, Susan (I1126)
 
29 It appears that was married in two parishes on two different dates - m a ybe to accommodate family. Both parishes are next to each other an d the d etails match up
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ROBERTSON, James (I1135)
 
30 James Austin and Mary, along with Mary´s 12 year old sister Agnes, arr i ved in New Zealand aboard the Zelandia which left London (10 Sep 186 3) a nd arrived in Lyttelton (8 Dec 1863) Under Captain Foster. They c ame ou t in Second Cabin.
Also An Agnes Rainey appears in the Will of James SHanks being at hi s d eath resididing in Canterbury NZ 
SHANKS, Agnes (I1127)
 
31 James Blyth:Autpbiographical Notes
Mr James Blyth was born In Newport, Fifeshire, Scotland on 15th May 18 3 7. He was educated at the Presbyterian School in his native town, an d a t the Grammar School, St Andrews. On leaving school he was apprent iced t o a Master-Builder in order to learn the trade of a carpenter.
At the end of his four year apprenticeship he was retained as a journe y man carpenter and continued to serve his employer in that capacity f or s ix months, and then decided to leave the land of his birth for fa r New Z ealand.
He left London on fifth October, 1858, in the ship “Strathallan” of fi v e hundred and forty tons register. The passengers numbered two hundr ed a nd thirty-five souls including thirty-two children. The immigrant s incl uded farm laborers, general laborers, gardeners, shepherds, bla cksmith c arpenters, sawyers, bricklayers, tailors, painters, domesti c servants a nd dressmakers. The voyage was full of interest. The Fren ch coast was s ighted on the morning of the 17th and shortly afterward s the rough weat her so often encountered in the Bay of Biscay was exp erienced. The weat her was stormy with a high sea running and sea-sick ness was general amo ng the passengers. Running into finer weather the y eventually reached t he tropics and the ship became becalmed in th e Doldrums. Fishing was in dulged in here. A twelve months old shark w as caught by the first mate, a nd the following morning the passenger s were regaled with shark for bre akfast fried in butter, and for te a on the same day shark stewed in vin egar. In order to interest thos e on board a ship's newspaper was publis hed periodically, being usual ly read after dinner. As occasion offered, t here were concerts, dance s, deck games and entertainments by a scrach b and. Very dirty weathe r was encountered in southern latitudes, and duri ng time there wa s a good deal or bickering, discontent and fighting tak ing place amon g members of the Crew. During the voyage two woman and si x children d ied and there were three births. On the morning of January 1 3th, Ne w Zealand was distinctly visible and on a bearing taken at noon, i t w as calculated that the ship was thirty-five miles from land. The Sh i p arrived of Timaru on 14th January, 1859. Timaru in those days wa s not hing but a whaling station. The buildings consisted of five hous es, Mr R hodes’s wool shed and an Accommodation house kept by Sam Will iams. The c ountry was a wilderness of tussock and flax. Owing to a la ck of accommo dation, James Blyth spent the first few nights under a f lax bush with n o other covering but for a blanket, and he continued t he outdoor night l ife for a month.
Two days after arrival he met Mr David Innes was in partnership with W i lliam Harrison in Pareora Station, a block of country of 25000 acre s ju st south of the Pareora river. Mr Innes engaged James Blyth a s a carpen ter to co-operate with two other tradesmen in the construct ion of a woo l-shed and house on that part of the run now known as Hol me station, th e wages being 12s6d a day and found. On the completio n of the wool-shed a nd the partial construction of the house, there w as a shortage of timbe r, and rather than stand idle the carpenters 1e ft but agreed to return l ater to complete the work. James Blyth wen t down to the Waimate bush wh ere he helped to build a sheep-dip and w ash, and later built a dairy at W aihao for a former employee of Mr In nes. On finishing this work, he dec ided to see some of the countrysid e and he thereupon commenced a long w alk to Dunedin. on reaching th e Waitaki, he was faced with the difficu lty of getting to the othe r side of the river in order to continue his t ramp. Meeting a Maori , he discussed hid difficulty and the native sugge sted the constructi on of a raft of koradi sticks and flax. Together the y built a raft si x feet by four feet, and the Maori poled the new colo nist across th e river. Navigation was difficult and tricky owing to the r apidly flo wing water; but the native proved himself a past-master with t he pole . On reaching the other side, the Maori declined to accept anyth ing f or the service he had rendered, and it was only after repeated eff ort s that Blyth prevailed on him to accept half a Sovereign for his tro u ble. The Waitaki plain was then a regular plaster of cabbage trees an d f lax. The Maori gave the pioneer directions as to his route, inform ing t hat after walking six miles he would reach Mr Filluel’s sheep st ation. H e stayed at the station that night and walked into Oamaru , a distance o r four miles, the following morning. Oamaru then consis ted of a blacksm ith’s shop, a carpenter’s shop and a few houses, th e first hotel being a t that time under construction. The traveller he re inquired the way to D unedin and continued on the even tenor of hi s way. The following mornin g he fell in with two sailors who had dese rted from a ship previously w hen at Port Chalmers and who where the n walking back to Port Chalmers w ith a view securing a job on a retur ning vessel. The journey to Dunedin o ccupied a week. The party staye d one night with the Maoris at Waikoiti a nd slept out other nights. O n reaching Port Chalmers they made a stay o f one night at the hotel , and the following morning the party took pass age in a boat to Duned in. In 1859, Dunedin was a very small place, a co uple of hotels, a fe w houses and several shops constituting the town at t hat time. Jame s Blyth stayed here for a month then took passage for Oam aru on the s teamer “Geelong”. On reaching Oamaru he proceeded on foot t o a ford o n the Waitaki river called Jimmy-the-needle’s crossing. He ha d to dis gorge the sum of £1 in advance before Jimmy would put him acros s th e river. A good swimming pony carried him across the river, and he t h en walked to Pike’s station, about eight miles north of the river, an d s tayed there the night. The following day he walked to Pareora Stat ion, a d istance of forty miles, and finding that additional supplie s of timber h ad been secured by Messrs. Harris and Innes he resumed w ork the followi ng morning and two months later had completed the work .
James Blyth tendered for the construction of a house for Mr W.K. Macdo n ald, 0rari Station, and secured the contract. It was a house of fiv e ro oms which was liked up with the original slab house. It was compl eted t o Mr Macdonald’s entire satisfaction in 1860. This was the begi nning of J ames Blyth's association with W.K. Macdonald, but was desti ned to cover a n umber of years during which Mr Blyth Carried out exte nsive work for Mr M acdonald.
Whilst James Blyth had the construction of W.K. Macdonald's the hous e i n hand, he met the lady who was to be the sharer joys and sorrow s over a l ong period of happy wedded life. Miss Alice Dunn the daught er of Thomas D unn who had a farm at Orari called the Stumps.
On the completion of Macdonald's house James Blyth decided that he wou l d give the "diggings" a go. He rode from Timaru up through the Lindu s P ass to the diggings. He joined two other men in the working of a c laim, p ut in plenty of work during a very hard winter there but witho ut any lu ck, and returned to Timaru. He then commenced business a s a Master-Buil der and carried out extensive work in town and country . On 2nd May, 186 3, he was united in Holy Matrimony with Alice Dunn a t her father's home , The Stumps, Orari, the ceremony being performe d by the first Anglican V icar of Geraldine, the Rev. Lawrence Brown . The happy couple made their h ome in Timaru and continued to resid e there for three years. Mr Blyth t hen secured a building contract a t Orari and other contracts in the sam e location following which th e Blyth's decided to move to Orari in orde r that Mr Blyth would be mo re conveniently placed to carry out the work . He purchased twenty acr es of land on which he built a house which the y made their home unti l the children became of school age when he sold o ut of the Orari pro perty and returned to Timaru. The family lived in Ti maru for severa l years, but the ever increasing contracts offering in T emuka town an d district brought about another move and he came to Temuk a in 1873 t o make the town his permanent hone. In 1875 he decided to en large th e sphere of his operations and to this end he commenced busines s a s a Timber and Hardware merchant. A Man of substance, he began to ta k e an active interest in municipal matters and played a prominent par t i n the formation and development of the town. For years he was chai rman o f the Temuka Town Board, and he has been a Justice of the Peac e for a l ong period of years.
He has been an enthusiastic worker in the Presbyterian Church and gav e o f his best in all things calculated to further its good work. In 1 894 h e made a trip to the old country where he travelled a great dea l before r eturning to New Zealand. In June 1922, after a happy associ ation extend ing over fifty-nine years, a partnership commenced on 2n d May 1863 came t o an end when Mrs Blyth passed away. Shortly after t he sad event Mr Bly th retired from business in order to enjoy remaini ng years of life in p eace and quiet. Well over ninety years of age, h e is a living testimony t o the inestimable benefits gained by a lif e of rectitude and hard work

The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District]
Old Colonists

Mr. James Blyth, J.P., was born in Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1837, a n d s erved an apprenticeship to the building trade. He came to Timaru b y t h e Strathallan,in 1859, and followed his trade until 1861, when h e trie d , his fortune on the Otago goldfields. Returning to Timaru, h e carried o n b usiness as a builder for some years, and settled in Te muka in 1872. I n 1 880 he commenced business as a timber, coal, and i ron mer chant. His p r emises occupy an acre and a-half of ground in W ood Street, where he als o has a large grain store. Mr. Blyth is distr ict agent for the National I nsurance Company. He has taken a leadin g part in all movements for the w elfare of the district, and was asso ciated with the Temuka Pioneers ' M emorial, which was erected in comm emoration of the Record Reign, and wa s unveiled by Mrs. Blyth on th e 16th of December, 1897. He was made a J ustice of the Peace in 1897 . Mr. Blyth is a member of the Masonic frat r nrity, and also of the A lexanda Lodge of Oddfellows, American order , i n which he has occupie d all the chairs and has been for years treasurer o f of the lodge. H e was one of the first members of the Temuka Town Boar d, of which h e was chairman from 1890 to 1894. Mr. Blyth was married in 1 862 to th e eldest daughter of Mr. Thos. Dunn, of The Stumps farm, Orari , and h as three sons and three daughters. 
BLYTH, James (I17)
 
32 James Hibbert Wanklyn was in Manchester business house of
Bradshaw, Hibbert & Wanklyn and li ved at Crumshall Hall. He
married his first cousin Margaret Bradshaw. James Hibbert
Wanklyn , the eldest son of William Wanklyn, merchant of
Manchester, born on the 4th August 1797, wa s a Brazilian
merchant, and in 1850 resided at Crescent, Salford. He served
the office of ch urchwarden of Manchester in 1828, and took
part in the management of the Manchester infirmary , and other
public charities, and was one of the original trustees and
patrons of St. Luke' s Church, Cheetham Hill, as well as a
magistrate of the county. He married, in 1823 or 24 Ma rgaret
Bradshaw, and left surviving issue, one Hibbert Wanklyn, now
vicar of Deopham, Norfolk . Mr J. H. Wanklyn died on the 18th
of October 1870 in his 74th year, having resided with hi s son
during the last two years of his life.
Mark Wanklyn 
WANKLYN, James Hibbert (I518)
 
33 Jane Nelson was baptised at St Mary Gate Independent Chapel, Nottingha m , E ngland, on 29 April 1801, daughter of James Nelson and his wife , Ann a M aria Dale. Her parents were Dissenters. In 1817 Jane was eng aged as a p u pil teacher by Mary Williams at her school in Southwell , Nottinghamshi r e. There she met Mary's son William, an ordained min ister, who was pre p aring for missionary work in New Zealand. Despit e Anna Nelson's initia l d iscouragement Jane and William were marrie d at Sheffield, on 11 July 1 8 25, and on 12 August sailed in the Si r George Osborne. On 25 March 182 6 t hey arrived at Paihia, where Wil liam's brother Henry, and his wife, M a rianne, had established a miss ion station.
Jane and Marianne Williams worked as well together as did the two brot h e rs. Both women were often pregnant, Jane having six daughters an d thre e s ons by 1846. The families shared meals and the two wives to ok turns a t c ooking and teaching. This close family bond was maintai ned after Wil li am and Jane left the Bay of Islands to set up a missi on station at Tu r anga, Poverty Bay, in 1840. Children were frequentl y exchanged, and th e l etters between the two women are now one of th e main sources of info rm ation about the minutiae of daily life at Pa ihia and Turanga.
Jane Williams, especially instructed by the Church Missionary Societ y i n L ondon to remember that 'no country can be happy or Christian b ut in p r oportion as its Females become so', was to seek every opport unity of i n fluencing Maori women. She taught them to read and write , to sew and c o ok (in European fashion), and trained them in 'civili sed' household ma n agement. Like her husband she took a special car e in visiting the sick . A t Paihia girls who had been making 'satisfa ctory progress' were ofte n t aken away by their relatives to serve th e shipping which frequented t h e Bay of Islands. There was little dan ger of this at Turanga, but ther e w as always some doubt as to whethe r her girls would turn up, because t r ibal demands took precedence.
To Turanga Maori, irrespective of age, Jane Williams was 'Mother'. Th e s h aring of household tasks and of childbirth gave Jane and the Mao ri peo p le an intimacy which was closer than that between male missio nary and c o nvert. When William Williams was away, the smooth runnin g of the missi o n devolved on Jane, who was also responsible for th e day-to-day teachi n g of her younger children. She was an efficien t person who had to bear w i th constant domestic interruptions of a s ort seldom suffered by her hu s band. Days of 'very great raru' (hindr ances and encumbrances) figure f r equently in her journals. Quiet eve nings with her husband and family s h e particularly valued, but ofte n William was away for weeks or months a t a t ime. 'These continual s eparations form my greatest trial', she wro te i n 1844, 'I try to rem ember that I am a soldier's wifeÉ. Still I can not b ut feel it.'
After leaving Turanga in 1865 for the Bay of Islands, Jane and Willia m s e ttled at Napier in 1867, where she took a lively interest in th e Hukar e re school for Maori girls, established close to her home b y her husban d i n 1875. After William's death on 9 February 1878 Jan e was one of the l a st survivors of the missionary band of the 1820s . Reminiscing in 1880 s h e wrote, 'we were always contented and happy ... never even dreamt of t h e land being occupied by Europeans. Civil ization was good for our chil d ren, but sadly marred our work.' She d ied at her residence, Hukarere, o n 6 O ctober 1896. Her obituary stat ed: 'The treasure William Williams b roug ht to these shores was tha t bright, intelligent, courageous and che erf ul soul'.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Jane Nelson was baptised at St Mary Gate Independent Chapel, Nottingha m , E ngland, on 29 April 1801, daughter of James Nelson and his wife , Ann a M aria Dale. Her parents were Dissenters. In 1817 Jane was eng agedas a p u pil teacher by Mary Williams at her school in Southwell , Nottinghamshi r e. There she met Mary's son William, an ordained min ister, who was pre p aring for missionary work in New Zealand. Despit e Anna Nelson's initia l d iscouragement Jane and William were marrie d at Sheffield, on 11 July 1 8 25, and on 12 August sailed in the Si r George Osborne.On 25 March 1826 t h ey arrived at Paihia, where Will iam's brother Henry, and his wife, Mar i anne, had established a missi on station.
Jane and Marianne Williams worked as well together as did the two brot h e rs. Both women were often pregnant, Jane having six daughters an d thre e s ons by 1846. The families shared meals and the two wives to ok turns a t c ooking and teaching. This close family bond was maintai ned after Wil li am and Jane left the Bay of Islands to set up a missi on station at Tu r anga, Poverty Bay, in 1840. Children were frequentl y exchanged, and th e l etters between the two women are now one of th e main sources of info rm ation about the minutiae of daily life at Pa ihia and Turanga.
Jane Williams, especially instructed by the Church Missionary Societyi n L o ndon to remember that 'no country can be happy or Christian bu t in pro p ortion as its Females become so', was to seek every opportu nityof infl u encing Maori women. She taught them to read and write, t o sewand cook ( i n European fashion), and trained them in 'civilised ' household managem e nt. Like her husband she took a special care i n visiting the sick. At P a ihia girls who had been making 'satisfacto ry progress' were often take n a way by their relatives to serve the s hipping which frequented the Ba y o f Islands. There was little dange r of this at Turanga, but there was a l ways some doubt as to whethe r her girls would turnup, because tribal d e mands took precedence.
To Turanga Maori, irrespective of age, Jane Williams was 'Mother'. Th e s h aring of household tasks and of childbirth gave Jane and the Mao ri peo p le an intimacy which was closer than that between male missio nary and c o nvert. When William Williams was away, the smooth runnin g of the missi o n devolved on Jane, who was also responsible for th e day-to-day teachi n g of her younger children. She was an efficien t person who had to bear w i th constant domestic interruptions of a s ort seldom suffered by her hu s band. Days of 'very great raru' (hindr ances and encumbrances) figure f r equently in her journals. Quiet eve nings with her husband and family s h e particularly valued, but ofte n William was away forweeks or months a t a t ime. 'These continual se parations form my greatest trial', she wro te i n 1844, 'I try to reme mber that I am a soldier's wifeÉ. Still I can not b ut feel it.'
After leaving Turanga in 1865 for the Bay of Islands, Jane and Willia m s e ttled at Napier in 1867, where she took a lively interest in th e Hukar e re school for Maori girls, established close to her home b y her husban d i n 1875. After William's death on 9 February 1878 Jan e was oneof the l a st survivors of the missionary band of the 1820s . Reminiscing in 1880 s h e wrote, 'we were always contented and happy ... never even dreamt of t h e land being occupied by Europeans. Civil ization was good for our chil d ren, but sadly marred our work.' She d ied at her residence, Hukarere, o n 6 O ctober 1896. Her obituary stat ed: 'The treasure William Williams b roug ht to these shores was tha t bright, intelligent,courageous and chee rfu l soul'.
_WEBTAG
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NELSON, Jane (I28)
 
34 MARR: _PRIM Y Family F111
 
35 Marriages performed at the Parish Church of BOCONNOC, Cornwall Thoma s L ane of Blisland & Ann Wherry o.t.p. by B(banns) 6 May 1795 Both ( s)
"Lean" and "Weary" witnesses, George Motton, Joseph Parson

Tombstone inscription in Blisland churchyard: This stone erected to t h e memory of Thomas Lean who died December 2nd 1826, aged 56 years a lso A nn wife of the above who died at Pendavey, Egloshayle February 2 0th 185 5, aged 81 years also Jemima their daughter who died May 5t h 1857, age d 53 years also Jane Bate who died September 10th 1835, a ged 23 years 
LEAN, Thomas (I989)
 
36 Married At Saint Peter and St Pauls Church, Parish Of Ashton Family F30
 
37 NOt sure if this is the same robert Lean as why would get married in D e von. need more evidence to back this up Family F22
 
38 OBJE: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
URL http://genealogy.eproject.co.nz/ 
BILLING, Thomas (I93)
 
39 Reference: Cyclopedia of New Zealand, Canterbury edition. Vol. 3 page s 9 18 Published 1903

OHAPE is seventeen miles to the north of Timaru in the county of Geral d ine. It is within five miles of Temuka, and has a bi-weekly mail se rvi ce with Timaru. The district is devoted to farming. has a public s chool a nd a blacksmith shop.

FARMERSº

AUSTIN, James, Farmer, Ohape, near Temuka. Mr Austin was born in Coun t y Down, Ireland, in 1837, and was brought up as a farmer by his fath er. H e came to Lyttelton in 1864 by the ship "Zealandia," and afte r farming f or three years at Selwyn, removed to Temuka in 1867 - jus t before the h eavy flood in that district. Mr Austin has a number o f farms, and in a ddition to cereal growing, is a breeder of sheep an d cattle at one tim e he owned a stud of Clydesdale horses. He was m arried in the Old Coun ty and has eleven children.

James and Mary Austin arrived in Lyttleton, New Zealand from County Do w n Ireland on December 8th, 1863 as paying passengers. They bough t a far m at Winchester, South Canterbury after 3 years in the Selwy n District. G randfather lived by the rules he set. If a man was worth y of his hire, h e was fit to sit at table with the family. He had 1 1 in the family, fin anced four sons and two son-in-laws into farms. B ought houses for them w hen they married. Daughters (single) had an in come for life and then on t heir death, this income was equally divide d among his 28 Grandchildren. M oney invested in his daughter´s farm s was held in trust to be equally d ivided among their respective fami lies at their death…Grandfather sold a 2 8 acre farm or was a tenant o n it to come to New Zealand in 1863 and af ter some years had 6000 acr es in South Canterbury and Mid-Canterbury. T wo farms are still in th e family. Grandmother was a teacher and a beaut iful sewer.´´
Extracts from a letter written by Agnes Kelly (née Connolly) May 1995 
AUSTIN, James (I119)
 
40 Robert Robertson And Margeret Robertson, of Aberdeenshire in Scotlan d a nd their six daughters left Glasgow on the 30 May 1860 aboard th e ship S S Henrietta, arriving in Dunedin on the 24th September 1860 . According t o the Otago Colonist Newspaper it was an eventfull voyag e with several d eaths on board on the way due to rampant disease, inc luding Robert Robe rtson as well as nine others. As a result Margere t Robertson and her si x daughters, including Christina Buchan Roberts on, who was only 1 year o ld arrived alone on our shores, the legend o f which continues in our fa mily today. HENRY, Margeret (I224)
 
41 TEXT: _WEBTAG
NAME WebTag
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BLYTH, James (I494)
 
42 TEXT: _WEBTAG
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TIPPING, Mary (I228)
 
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KINGDON, Jonathan (I83)
 
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HENWOOD, Rebecca (I84)
 
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KINGDON, Elizabeth (I92)
 
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CLARK, Janet (I1136)
 
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Clark, James (I1138)
 
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Gray, Isabel (I1139)
 
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Robertson, Elizabeth (I1140)
 
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Robertson, Isabel (I1141)
 

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